home > Tertiary education

BEST TERTIARY EDUCATION ESSAYS

  • Tertiary education
    Genetically modified organisms (GMO)
    GMO How are genetically modified organisms different from non-genetically modified organism? Genetically modified organisms are animals, plants and other organisms whose genetic composition was altered using genetic recombination and modification techniques performed in a laboratory. On the other hand, non-GMO organisms are those organisms that are produced naturally and were not modified (the organic & non organic report 2017; rumiano cheese 2011 & non-gmoproject 2016). The recent acts of activist intent on destruction of research plots included plants altered by molecular as well as classical genetic techniques. Is it possible to distinguish between plants altered by classical genetics and those altered by modern techniques? If it’s possible, how is it done?  It is possible and it can be distinguished by checking the DNA of the organism. Thion et al. 2002 conducted an experiment on how to extract/purify DNA of soybeans to check if the sample was transgenic and had undergone extraction and purification. The checking can be done through the use of a microscopic technology. Meanwhile, Schreiber (2013) adds that the detection could be done through a biochemical means where the present GMO will be measured. In isolating and amplifying a piece of DNA, the technique using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used to make millions of copies of the strands of the DNA. It is easier to see visually the altered and non-altered DNA if there are millions of copies of the DNA. What safeguards are in place to protect Americans from unsafe food? Are these methods science-based? Mention at least 2 methods. The US government safeguards the Americans from unsafe foods through the FDA or US Food and Drug Administration. Their methods are science-based, i.e. its whole genome sequencing technology and its measures in controlling microbial hazards. The whole genome sequencing technology is used by the FDA in identifying pathogens isolated from food. The FDA also safeguards foods by controlling microbial hazards through the process of elimination of growth and reduction of growth. The elimination methods are either through heating or freezing while the reduction of growth method involves the use of acidity, temperature and water activity. (Bradsher et al. 2015, pp. 85 – 86; FDA 2007; FDA 2013). Name at least 10 examples of harm to citizens from unsafe food. What percentage of these illnesses was caused by genetically modified organisms? If so, mention any example Some examples of harm to people from unsafe foods are harmful diseases extending from diarrhea to cancer caused by eating foods contaminated with viruses, bacteria, chemical substances and parasites. Around 600 million people around the world fell ill after consumption of contaminated food; diarrheal diseases cause around 125,000 death of children 0-5 years of age (WHO 2015). Based on the studies made by IRT (2011), foods from genetically modified organisms cause damage to the immune system, gastrointestinal and other organs, infertility and accelerated aging. These happen because residue or bits of materials of the GMO food can be left inside the person’s body, which eventually can cause long-term problems. Statistics show that in 9 years after the introduction of GMOs in the market, Americans who had chronic illnesses rose from 7 to 13% and other diseases such as digestive problems, autism, and reproductive disorders are rising (IRT 2011).
    $ 0.13
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    ‘Globalisation is good’ or ‘is it not?’
    ‘Globalisation is good’ or ‘is it not?’ Globalisation is good because it opens doors of opportunities to many. It was the reason for the broad and speedy worldwide interconnectedness of the current social life – from cultural to criminal and from financial to spiritual. This is synonymous to having a borderless world but critics argue stating that globalisation has in fact disconnected the world from its national geographical divisions – the countries (Yoong & Huff 2007). Although some are discounting the benefits of globalisation to the world, I still consider globalisation to be the driving force in the global partnerships between companies that created more opportunities and jobs. The world trade may have plunged, the dollar dwindled, commodities slumped, but overall, globalisation has brought good to the peoples of the world. Globalisation through the internet has unlocked the doors to the sharing of cultures, knowledge, goods and services between peoples of all countries and the modern technologies lifted the barriers for accommodating a speedy transfer. The case of Inditex in marketing their Zara brand globally manifests that in business, one formula does not fit all. Every country has its own culture and styles and a business that is going global must do their homework well before entering the new market. Inditex’s Zara brand was a success to the Europeans but struggles in America and still trying their luck with the Chinese. But despite of these differences, the company is still considering going global because they needed new markets and they knew they will be opening bigger opportunities and jobs to more people (La Coruna 2012). Moreover, globalisation has also done well to the manufacturing sector. Statistics show that the global industrial output in 2010 registered fifty-seven times more than the production in the 1900. Also, globalisation has changed the way things are produced. The manufacturers going global take advantage of the skills and the costs of producing products in different countries. This means that the design of the product may be done in the US, manufactured in China or Taiwan then assembled in the Philippines. So every item – be it an iPad, a doll or a washing machine is collaboratively produced by the best skilled workers in the world at the lowest labor cost (The economist 2012). Consequently, since the product was a collaboration of different countries so it can be also marketed and patronized in those countries (The economist 2012). However, there are some who are openly argues that it failed to deliver the many publicized benefits to the poor. A Filipino economist, Walden Bello, coins a new term to describe the present global economic situation as caused by “deglobalisation” due to the downturn of the economies of big countries such as Singapore, Taiwan, Germany, Japan and Brazil. However, the poor countries are the ones that show faster growth than the rich countries, making globalisation still good because of the opportunities it gives to the needy. On the other hand, Dunning, et al (2007) claims that the current inclinations in the global economy reflect a more distributed rather than a geographical sharing of multi-national enterprise activity and foreign direct investments and to the carrying-out of transactions that are globally oriented. Contrary to the common beliefs, globalisation is not a new thing in the global business world. According to McMahon (2004) it existed since the late parts of the fifteenth century when a society of nations consisting of the countries in Northern Europe entered the rest of the world through exploration, trade and then conquest. This process which involves the exploitation of wealth and power by the European voyagers lead to industrialization in Britain, then mass international industrialization and eventually globalisation (McMahon 2004). Sheel (2005) adds that the interchange of technology and markets between countries have been among the first human innovations since the most primitive times. Globalisation was termed that time as “exchange” where the country’s surpluses were exchanged with other surpluses of peoples from other countries. This old system of exchange was developed, continued to grow and increased to greater heights in the modern times (Waters 2001 as cited in van Krieken, et al 2006). Robertson (2003) asserts that globalisation is inherent in people, motivated by their desire for self-interest and cooperation for survival. The author theorizes that globalisation existed due to the encouragement of interconnectedness by the social, political, economic and technological growths performing as catalysts for both local and global developments (Robertson 2003). Robertson (2003) claims that globalisation has emerged in three waves – during the 1500 to 1800 for the first wave, 18th century up to the 20th century for the second wave and the third wave is after the World War 2. However, Sheel (2008) categorizes globalisation in four phases – the 1st phase took place on the 16th century, the 2nd phase on the late 18th century, the 3rd phase during the 19th to 20th century and the fourth phase is during the end of the 20th century. According to the analysis of Robertson (2003), the first wave (1500 to 1800) saw the upsurge of colonization, invasion, imperialism, misery of the indigenous people, migration and changes in politics, economy and culture. The first wave has encouraged the creation of interconnectedness between peoples, countries and cultures, as instigated by commerce and trade. The second phase (18th to 20th century) was characterized by the start of Industrial Revolution, paving the way for industrialization and increase of income and profits especially to those who had technological skills. The trade routes created during the first wave were utilized by the manufacturers in sourcing their raw materials from other countries. However, by the end of the second wave, civil conflicts in many countries arose, same with the unfortunate events of World Wars 1 and 2 and the Great Depression. The third phase of globalisation transpired after World War 2. This was the phase when European economies were down whilst USA was enjoying a flourishing economy with tough industrial foundation and strong military. The latter part of the third phase (during the middle of the 20th century), the growth of globalisation was challenged by the emergence of communist ideology and the military force of Soviet Union. This challenge resulted to cold war between USA and Soviet Union where Soviet Union collapsed in 1989 (Robertson 2003). In addition to Robertson’s analysis, Sheel (2005) adds that there exists a fourth phase of globalisation that happened during the end of the 20th century where countries the developing and developed countries merged as partners in cross border trade and investments, stimulating the convergence of India and China. However, issues about globalisation’s worthiness have surfaced, some critics consisting of anti-globalisation groups argue that globalisation in corporate organisations have increased povery and inequality (Engler 2007). A study was made by World Value Survey regarding globalisation and 57% of the survey respondents consider globalisation as good. Most of the approving respondents were optimistic that globalisation would encourage the improvement of the workers’ working conditions, economic equality, global peace, global stability and human rights (Leiserowitz, et al 2006). But still, anti-globalisation groups insist that poverty, homelessness and environmental destruction will be highlighted if globalisation continues as it only centers on increasing trade and investment but ignores environmental protections and human rights (Engler 2007). But Edwards & Usher (2008) comment that the argument of the anti-globalisation groups are only superficial because despite their protests against globalisation they still engage in globalisation practices such the use of computers, internets and mobiles in their dissemination of their opposition. This manifests that these protesters are only selective in their opposition. They are not against the good effects of globalisation in communication but only on the aspect of capitalism. The inequality of wealth and poverty is one of the issues that plagued globalisation where critics claim that it makes the poor countries poorer and the rich countries richer as they exploit and amass the wealth of the minority country. But Holmes, et al (2007) reason that there is really a big difference on the distribution of benefits as the developed country provides the money or the capital whilst the developing country (minority) offers its resources and labor. This set-up ends-up with the developed country that provided the financial capitalization getting the bigger share of the profit. However, one aspect of globalisation that really brought good benefits to the people is the technological globalisation. Dahlman (2007) describes technological globalisation as the development of knowledge and skills through research by capable engineers and scientists and offering them to countries that have no inventive capability. The acquisition of these inventions by other countries enables them of acquiring technological transfer. Technologies can be transferred through technical assistance, direct foreign investment, importation of goods and components of products, licensing, copying and reverse engineering (Dahlman 2007). The advancement of communication technology through networking has opened more opportunities and economic growth. In addition, the video of Johan Norberg entitled “Globalisation is good – the case of Taiwan” illustrates the importance of globalisation in uplifting the poor conditions of poor countries. The video presented two former poor countries – Taiwan and Kenya – and compare and contrast what have they become 50 years after. Taiwan became 20 times progressive than Kenya whilst Kenya remained a poor country. Norberg explains that the reason for this difference is the globalisation that Taiwan embraced 50 years ago. Taiwan allowed capitalists to invest in their country whilst they provide the resources and labor. Moreover, Taiwan allowed the integration of their economy to the global trade whilst Kenya continued to shun globalisation. The video also presented the value of the multinational companies like Nike that employs the labor force of Vietnam in their sweatshop. Instead of being exploited, the Vietnamese were given good working conditions, high salaries and more benefits. Contrary of the claim of anti-globalisation groups that multinational investors will only exploit local workers, Vietnamese workers were given the opportunity to rise from their poverty through the works provided for them by globalisation. Conclusion: Contrary to what most people believe, globalisation has been in existence since time immemorial through surplus “exchange” and though the people were not yet privy to the term, they were already using the method of globalisation in their interconnection with other people’s business and lives. Now that the term globalisation is out in the open, people all around the world become mindful of each other’s affairs and consequences, disapproving how the system of globalisation makes the rich countries richer and the poor countries poorer. But as Norberg (2012) has seen it, globalisation is good as it intends to improve productivity and working condition. Though critics argue that it only exploits and amass the wealth of the poor country, Norberg was right when he said that if it is exploitation, then the world’s problem is by not exploiting the poor properly. The case of Taiwan and Kenya is already an eye-opener to those who still shut the door to globalisation. There may be ups and downs in the world of business but it cannot be blamed everything to globalisation because globalisation is only a method of interaction and not the one that is making the business or the deal. Globalisation through the internet has opened the doors to the sharing of cultures, knowledge, goods and services between peoples of all countries and the modern technologies lifted the barriers for accommodating a speedy transfer. The case of Inditex in marketing their Zara brand globally manifests that in business, one formula does not fit all. Every country has its own culture and styles and a business that is going global must be well prepared before entering the new market. Inditex’s Zara brand was a success to the Europeans but struggles in America and still trying their luck with the Chinese. But despite of these differences, the company is still considering going global because they needed new markets and they knew they will be opening bigger opportunities and jobs to more people. This proves that globalization brings good to many but one must know how to diversify and take advantage of the various benefits of globalization to reach greater success in the future.
    $ 0.13
    12,670words / 1page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Explicit Teaching
    Explicit Teaching Introduction Not all students are equal. Some are fast learners; others need assistance while others are unruly – not because they are doing it intentionally, but because they are suffering from learning disabilities causing hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. Some adjustments are needed in the learning environment and these adjustments should be tailored based on the individual learning needs of the students. Explicit teaching provides active communication and interaction between the student and the teacher and it involves direct explanation, modeling and guided practice (Rupley & Blair 2009). This paper will demonstrate Explicit Teaching applied to a class scenario with students suffering from a learning disability known as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity. Furthermore, a lesson will be developed featuring an example of an explicit teaching approach showing how to differentiate the lesson to meet the needs of every student, with or without learning disability before finally concluding. 2A: ET Creating a Scenario One of the learning disabilities encountered is AD/HD or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, a neurological disorder that is likely instigated by biological factors that impact chemical messages (neurotransmitters) in some specific parts of the brain. In this type of learning disability, the parts of the brain that control reflective thought and the restriction of ill-considered behavior are affected by the slight imbalances in the neurotransmitters (ADCET 2014). AD/HD is characterized by hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. Students with ADHD are those who never seem to listen, cannot sit still, do not follow instruction no matter how clear the instructions are presented to them, or those who just interrupt others and blurt-out improper comments at improper times. Moreover, these students are oftentimes branded as undisciplined, troublemakers or lazy (NHS 2008). In managing students with AD/HD, some adjustments in the learning environment are needed and these adjustments should be tailored based on the individual needs of the student. It should be noted that persons with AD/HD have different manifestations and the nature of disability as well as its effect on the student’s learning also vary (ADCET 2014). Direct instruction is considered as one of the best approaches in teaching students with AD/HD, but it must be used skilfully and the teacher should think of strategies to prevent it from becoming boring. Killen (2003) states that in using direct instruction, the teacher should emphasise teaching in small steps so the student will be able to practice every step and their practice will be guided to come-up with high level of success. In teaching a student with AD/HD, creative presentation of course material is advisable and this could be done through the use of visual aids and hands-on experience to stimulate the student’s senses. The teacher may use personal stories such as the student’s ideas and experiences (Killen (2003). It will also help if the teacher encourages the student with AD/HD to sit in front or near in front of the classroom to limit distractions (Tait 2010). Telling the student of what the teacher wants him to learn or be able to do – such as reading, writing, etc. - will help in the student’s better understanding of the lesson. In presenting the lesson, the teacher should present the lesson at a pace that the student can handle, such as not too slow or too fast. Important points should be emphasised so the student will realise its significance. To check if the student understands the lesson, the teacher may ask questions and if the student cannot answer, the teacher should re-explain everything that the student gets confused with. New words or new terms should be explained through examples. Assigning colors to different objects is a good visual aid in processing visual information. To help the student with AD/HD process written material, the teacher may use various verbal descriptions as possible. A list of acronyms and terms will also help, as well as a variety of teaching formats like films, flow charts or handouts. At the end of the lesson, a summary should be given, stressing the important points of the lesson. 2B: ET Lesson PlanKey Learning Area: Math Stage: 7 Year level: Year 7 Unit/Topic: Algebra Learner Outcomes: This lesson focuses in essential algebraic topics intended to prepare students for the study of Algebra and its applications. Students are introduced to topics involving mathematical operations with whole numbers, decimals and integers. Upon completion of this lesson, students are expected to answer and use mathematical language to show understanding; use reasoning to identify mathematical relationships; and continue and be familiar with repeating patterns. Indicators: At the end of the lesson, students are able to recognise what comes next in repeating patterns, identify patterns used in familiar activities, recognise an error in a pattern, able to simplify algebraic fractions, factorise quadratic expressions and operate with algebraic expressions. Resources: Whiteboard, colored visual aids, workbooks and class notes where the procedures are listed. Prior Knowledge: Students possess basic math knowledge (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). They also have basic understanding of the terms such as whole numbers, positive, negative, decimals and integers. Assessment Strategies: To assess the students’ learning, students will be asked to do mathematical operations. Their answers will be checked, marked and recorded; and those who are unable to answer correctly will be asked what is it that they are getting confused. For students with learning disability, their computations will be checked and evaluated. Comments will be recorded in a record book regarding the student’s performance.
    $ 0.13
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Ethical Promotion Paper (Nursing)
    Ethical Promotion Paper In today’s globalization, the use of electronic health record significantly helps in sharing patient’s information to other healthcare providers across health organizations for patient’s better access to health care, decrease of costs and improvement of the quality of care (Ozair et al. 2015). However, the increasing use of electronic health record of patients over paper records sometimes generates ethical issues that should be given attention. Nurses are bound to follow the Code of Ethics and sharing of patient information, even digitally, should be done within the right conduct. This paper will discuss the article written by Ozair, Jamshed, Sharma & Aggrawal (2015) entitled, “Ethical issues in electronic health records: a general overview”, which was published in Perspectives in Clinical Research. My thoughts on the role that health care professionals should play in resolving the said ethical issue will also be discussed, as well as the specific theory that will support my position. Article’s Summary Ozair et al. (2015) aimed to explore the ethical issues created in the use of electronic health record (EHR), as well as to discuss its possible solutions. Although the use of digital health record could improve the patient’s quality of healthcare and decrease cost, transferring or sharing information through digital technology poses hazards that could lead to security breaches and endanger safety of information. When the patient’s information or health data are shared to others without the patient’s consent, then their autonomy is put at risk. Electronic health record contains the patient’s health data including his/her medical diagnoses, history, immunization dates, treatment plans and laboratory results. Every person has the right to privacy and confidentiality and his information can only be shared if he permits it or dictated by law. If the information was shared because of clinical interaction, then that information should be treated as confidential and be protected. The confidentiality of information can be protected by allowing only the authorized personnel to have access. Thus, the users are identified and assigned with passwords and usernames. However, these may not be enough to protect the confidentiality of the patient’s information and stronger policies on security and privacy are needed to secure the information. According to a survey, around 73% of doctors communicate with other doctors through text about work and when mobile devices get lost or stolen, the confidentiality of the information about patients are put at stake. Hence, security measures such as intrusion detection software, antivirus software and firewalls should be used to protect the integrity of data and maintain patient’s confidentiality and privacy. When patient data is transferred, there is a possibility of the data getting lost or destructed especially when errors are made during the “cut and paste” process. The integrity of data may also be compromised when the physician uses drop down menu and his/her choices become limited due to the choices available in the menu, causing him/her to select the wrong choice, thus, leading to huge errors. However, the authors claim that these ethical issues can be resolved through the creation of an effective EHR system, involving clinicians, educators, information technologies and consultants in the development and implementation of the ERH system. My Thoughts on the role of health care professionals The role of health care professionals is vital in ensuring that the right of patients to privacy and confidentiality are observed even in the use of electronic health record (EHR). Patient’s human rights in care include their rights to confidentiality and privacy (Cohen & Ezer 2013). To ensure that there will be no ethical issues created in the use of EHR, health care professionals should be properly informed about the importance of the system, as well as the ethical issues that could arise if the rights of the patient are not properly observed. Hence, it is vital that the knowledge of the health care professionals regarding the right implementation of EHR starts from their education curriculum, as well as in their continuous training and nurses’ participation in the workflow of EHR (Koolaee, Safdan & Bouraghi 2015). Computer literacy is a must for health care professionals to ensure that the sharing of health data information are not lost or destructed during the process and medical errors are not committed. Conclusion The use of electronic health record improves and increases efficiency in patient care, as well as patients’ access to care across health organizations. However, health care professionals should never ignore the rights of patients to their privacy and confidentiality so they should be properly informed if ever there is a need for their health data information to be shared to others to avoid ethical issues. List of References Cohen J. & Ezer T. (2013). ‘Human rights in patient care: a theoretical and practical
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Goiter Name Institution Affiliation Goiter Healthcare plays a critical role that ensures healthy population able to enhance the production of services and goods in the economic, political as well as social fields. Many believe that indeed a healthy population is a wealthy population. Diseases more often have a negative impact on the society that results to lose concerning costs of accessing treatment. At worse it even leaves permanent scars and physical disability among others limiting the possibility of people realizing their full potential in life. However, this paper discusses goiter disease noting its cause, sign, and symptoms, risks factors, complications, types, diagnosis, and treatment. Many factors cause goiter disease. Grave’s disease that causes the thyroid glands to produce too much thyroid stimulating hormones (TSH) resulting in a swelled thyroid (Giesecke et al., 2017). Hashimoto disease also causes goiter due to too little thyroid hormone produced. Thyroid nodules, thyroid cancer, pregnancy, Thyroiditis, and Iodine deficiency also causes goiter. The sign and symptoms of goiter include swelling or lump in area of the neck, difficulty swallowing and pain in the throat when swallowing, hoarseness, fullness feeling in the neck, pressure on the windpipe or esophagus, coughing as well as a lump that is tender to the touch and a tight feeling in the throat (Osansky, 2013). The risks factors of goiter disease include some issues that are naturally caused as well as human-caused. First, goiter is more prone to women due to the thyroid disorders and, therefore, being female would increase the chances of developing goiter disease. Lack of diet with iodine also is a risk factor (Karaköse et al., 2017). It is common in areas that are short of iodine and often in the regions that are far from coastal areas. Additionally, family or personal medical history of the autoimmune disease might increase the chance of one developing goiter disease. Age is also a risk a factor where most people over the age of 40 years are more likely to develop the disease. Radiation treatments and exposure, as well as pregnancy and menopause, increase the risks factors of developing the goiter disease. The complications that goiter disease show includes the difficulty that people affected show when breathing as well as swallowing challenges. It can also cause hoarseness and cough that can make one experience difficulty when talking (Melmed, Polonsky, Larsen & Kronenberg, 2016). Also, difficulty and trouble sleeping and fatigue can add to the complications that goiter can develop. The types of goiter disease are two described mainly by the causing agent or factor. They include nodular goiter when, and in the event of missing nodules, it is described as diffuse goiter. Goiter is diagnosed visually or manually in a clinical examination. Many options in diagnosis exist that include blood tests as well as antibody tests can help detect the presence of goiter disease in the human body. Samples are carefully analyzed in the laboratory to confirm thyroid hormone and TSH level levels (Karaköse et al., 2017). Imaging tests also are used where ultrasounds, Computed tomography (CT) scans as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) can be used as a diagnosis option. Finally, a thyroid scans as well as a biopsy where they obtain fluids or tissues for testing. Treatment of goiter also has more option to choose from determined by different factors. Among the options available include the Thyroid hormone replacement drugs and Antithyroid drugs (Giesecke et al., 2017). A dose of radioactive iodine that acts by shrinking the thyroid gland can also be considered in a treatment process called radioactive iodine treatment (RAI). A thyroidectomy is also a treatment option that uses surgery where part or the entire thyroid is removed, and the choice is considered when other alternatives fail to give positive results. Finally, Iodine replacement can also be found where a supplement of iodine that often stops growth slightly is given (Melmed et al., 2016). In conclusion, early symptoms of goiter disease need to be checked so that immediate actions can be taken to prevent the disease from developing further into more complicated and challenging status. Immediate treatment should be instituted as soon as it is diagnosed. References Giesecke, P., Rosenqvist, M., Frykman, V., Friberg, L., Wallin, G., Höijer, J., … Törring, O. (2017). Increased Cardiovascular Mortality and Morbidity in Patients Treated for Toxic Nodular Goiter Compared to Graves’ Disease and Nontoxic Goiter. Thyroid, 27(7), 878–885. https://doi.org/10.1089/thy.2017.0029 Karaköse, M., Hepsen, S., Çakal, E., Saykı Arslan, M., Tutal, E., Akın, Ş., … Özbek, M. (2017). Frequency of nodular goiter and autoimmune thyroid disease and association of these disorders with insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome. Journal of the Turkish-German Gynecological Association, 18(2), 85–89. https://doi.org/10.4274/jtgga.2016.0217 Melmed, S., Polonsky, K. S., Larsen, P. R., & Kronenberg, H. (2016). Williams textbook of endocrinology. Philadelphia, PA : Elsevier. Osansky, E. M. (2013). Natural treatment solutions for hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease: Discover how following a natural thyroid treatment protocol can restore your health ... and help you to avoid radioactive iodine. Charlotte, NC: Natural Endocrine Solutions.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Global Warming Research Paper  Name Institution Global Warming Research Paper  The fact that climate change is presently the biggest environmental challenge facing humanity is nearly incontestable. It occurs when the climate system of the earth develops new weather patterns over time; these weather patterns tend to have more adverse effects than positive impacts on the survival and existence of human beings and other living creatures (Hardy, 2013). It has led to changing weather patterns that have threatened food production. It has also resulted in rising sea levels that increases the risks such as those of catastrophic flooding. One of the most devastating impacts of climate change is global warming (Butler, 2018). This paper will explore the impact of climate change, with particular reference to global warming. According to Goldstein (2015), global warming is defined as the increase in the average surface temperatures in the atmosphere. It is a phenomenon characterized by a rise in the air temperatures in the earth surface, and which has been taking place for the last two centuries. Its various weather phenomena include storms, precipitation, temperatures, and atmosphere’s chemical composition among others (United Nations, 2019). Climate scientists explain that there are numerous causes of global warming. The first cause relates to the rise in greenhouse gases. The primary greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming is carbon dioxide. This gas is caused by the burning of fossil fuels in motor vehicles, construction sites, manufacturing plans, heating, and electricity generation among others (NRDC, 2016). Methane is the second cause of the increase in greenhouse gases; mostly, methane is emitted from waste, rice farming, and livestock. Nitrogen oxide also contributes to the rise in greenhouse gas; it results mainly from industrial activities and excess fertilizer use. The other gas that increases greenhouse gases is HCFCs, which is gas from human activities, and even though it is harmless to the ozone layer, it leads to a rise in the greenhouse effect (Haldar, 2011). The second major cause of global warming is deforestation. Forests play an important role in the absorption of carbon dioxide through the process of photosynthesis. They also help in returning oxygen to the atmosphere, and as such, cutting down trees or reducing forest cover has negative effects on the environment Goldstein (2015). The third main cause of global warming is the destruction of marine ecosystems. Marine ecosystems such as oceans are carbon sinks, and they are responsible for absorption of up to 50 percent of carbon dioxide (Butler, 2018). However, when they are destroyed, their capacity to absorb carbon dioxide reduces resulting in ocean acidification and the death of fauna and flora. The other cause behind global warming is population increase. A rise in population puts pressure on natural resources thereby speeding up the increase in greenhouse gas emissions (United Nations, 2019). There is a consensus among climate scientists that climate change, and global warming in particular has devastating effects on the environment and every living thing, with human beings being the most affected (Hardy, 2013). The rapid rise in the global temperature results in disastrous effects, which endanger the survival and existence of the fauna and flora. Among the worst consequences is the melting of the ice mass at the poles, which causes the increase in sea level. These effects also threaten coastal environments and produce flooding (NRDC, 2016). So, what are the specific consequences of global warming because of climate change? According to Butler (2018), global warming leads to severe and more frequent weather. A warmer climate results in changed weather patterns in a manner that makes dry areas to drier and wet areas wetter. As a result, the world is experiencing more climate disaster events such as wildfires, drought, storms, and floods among others (Haldar, 2011). Besides, more severe and frequent weather poses significant risks to public safety and health. It also jeopardizes the access to clean drinking water, in addition to causing extreme heat events. At the opposite end of the spectrum, more severe weather results in heavier rains that cause water bodies to overflow, thereby damaging property and life, as well as cause other negative environmental effects like contaminating drinking water and promoting mold infestation (Goldstein, 2015). The second consequence of global warming resulting from climate change is increased death rates. Scientists indicate that climate change, and global warming in particular is the world’s biggest health threat that affects people of all ages, ethnic groups, socio-economic class, and race, in various direct and indirect ways (United Nations, 2019). Increase in temperatures contributes to illness incidences, deaths, and emergency room visits to go up. Higher temperatures often lead to life-threatening illnesses such as kidney and cardiovascular diseases and heatstroke among others (Haldar, 2011). The other related adverse effect of global warming is dirtier air. It worsens air pollution by increasing ground level ozone. Air pollution is associated with increased hospital admission rates and deaths linked to illnesses like asthma. Dirtier air has worse health effects on people suffering from pulmonary or cardiac diseases (NRDC, 2016). The third major consequence of global warming resulting from climate change is higher wildlife extinction rates. The rise in the atmospheric temperatures affects the ecology of sea and land inhabited by the wild animals (Goldstein, 2015). This phenomenon has led animals to shift their geographic ranges to higher altitudes and cooler areas in their attempts to escape extreme heat. They have also been forced to change their traditional migration patterns and seasonal behaviors (Haldar, 2011). Despite these adaption mechanisms, wildlife are at increased risk of extinction due to global warming. Studies have shown that vertebrates such as reptiles, mammals, and birds are disappearing 114 times faster due to global warming (Butler, 2018). The other consequence of global warming occasioned by climate change is the rise of acidic oceans. The marine ecosystems are under increased pressure due to this phenomenon; they are becoming more acidic because of their absorption of excess emissions (Hardy, 2013). The acceleration of acidification poses a serious threat to underwater life, including the lives of creatures like corals and mollusks, which have calcium carbonate skeletons and shells. Related to this effect is the consequence of higher sea levels (NRDC, 2016). This risk is particular greater in the Polar Regions as they are vulnerable to a warming atmosphere. It is estimated that the average Arctic temperatures are increasing as twice as fast. Such impacts have serious consequences for the people depending on seas for livelihood and those living around the, and on sea plants and wildlife as well (Haldar, 2011).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Global Warming Research Paper  Name Institution Global Warming Research Paper  The fact that climate change is presently the biggest environmental challenge facing humanity is nearly incontestable. It occurs when the climate system of the earth develops new weather patterns over time; these weather patterns tend to have more adverse effects than positive impacts on the survival and existence of human beings and other living creatures (Hardy, 2013). It has led to changing weather patterns that have threatened food production. It has also resulted in rising sea levels that increases the risks such as those of catastrophic flooding. Apart from being considered as being the most significant contributor to climate change and global warming, the United States also is seen to be the country bearing and will continue to bear the devastating effects of this phenomenon (Butler, 2018). This paper will explore the impact of climate change in an area of interest, my home state of Alaska. Considering the nature of global warming, it is obvious that all areas in the world will feel its effects, including every state in the United States. Alaska is already experiencing dramatic climatic and landscape changes as a result of global warming. This state is entering a new era of wildfires because of climate change; rising temperatures are altering its landscape and character thereby bringing the wildfires ravages (State at Risk, 2018). Available data shows that Alaska has warmed more than two folds as fast as the other states in the past 60 years, with the average temperatures rising up by about 3°F. It is projected that temperatures in Alaska will have increased by an additional 2-4 degrees by 2050 (Climate Central, 2015). This increase in temperatures are expected to come with consequences such as the rise in wildfires risks in this state. According to Goldstein (2015), global warming is a phenomenon characterized by a rise in the air temperatures in the earth surface, and which has been taking place for the last two centuries. Its various weather phenomena include storms, precipitation, temperatures, and atmosphere’s chemical composition among others (United Nations, 2019). Climate scientists explain that there are numerous causes of global warming. Alaska is not only experiencing increase in atmospheric temperatures but also other consequences that come with this effect. For example, the state is experiencing more mosquito days, in addition to being at a greater Zika virus risk. It is projected that the heat wave days will continue going into the future as the impact of climate change continue to become evident in Alaska (State at Risk, 2018). Besides, the impact of global warming in my home state of Alaska is seen through the disappearance of snow. As a result of extremely warm temperatures and changing weather patterns in Alaska, snow has been a virtual no-show in this state (Thompson, 2016). The main reason for this trend is the prevailing pattern of air masses over this area. The new pattern is keeping the region warm and pushing storms away, as well as keeping it dry. The warming in Alaska has been the most dramatic over the last 60 years compared to other parts of the United States. This trend has not just resulted in the increase in extremely warm days but also led to a decline in very cold days (Thompson, 2016). As global warming continue to worsen, it is projected that the average annual temperature of Alaska will increase to 6°F to 12°F (3°C to 7°C) (State at Risk, 2018) in the next 80 years. There are also concerns that this trend will further melt glaciers and change the local ecosystems. Moreover, global warming has significantly contributed to the rise of coastal flooding in Alaska. Due to this phenomenon, coastal flooding has disproportionately affected Native Alaskans, who are the majority residents in remote coastal villages in the northern and western coastal areas where topography is relatively flat. It is estimated that Alaska’s 100-year coastal floodplain will expand by over 15,000 square miles by 2050 because of global warming; this expansion will by far be the most of any American state (Climate Central, 2015). As a result of global warming, presently, Alaska has about 17,000 people who are at risk of coastal flooding, and it is projected that this figure will go up by 3,000 people by 2050 as a result of rising seas (State at Risk, 2018). Furthermore, the impact of global warming in my home state of Alaska is demonstrated by the reduction of the arctic sea ice. Persistent warmth has been baking the region, thus making snow a no-show in many parts, in addition to slowing the arctic sea ice growth. Sea ice is one of the key indicators of planetary health. Therefore, its continued disappearance is a cause of a major concern regarding how the planet is faring as the effects of global warming continue to bite. The winter arctic sea ice has been reducing by 3.2 percent every decade since 1979; Alaska is warming at twice the rate of the other parts of the world (Kahn, 2016). Like in other parts of the world, global warming effects in Alaska are as a result of various causes. The first cause relates to the rise in greenhouse gases. The primary greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming is carbon dioxide. This gas is caused by the burning of fossil fuels in motor vehicles, construction sites, manufacturing plans, heating, and electricity generation among others (NRDC, 2016). Methane is the second cause of the increase in greenhouse gases; mostly, methane is emitted from waste, rice farming, and livestock. Nitrogen oxide also contributes to the rise in greenhouse gas; it results mainly from industrial activities and excess fertilizer use. The other gas that increases greenhouse gases is HCFCs, which is gas from human activities, and even though it is harmless to the ozone layer, it leads to a rise in the greenhouse effect (Haldar, 2011). The second major cause of global warming is deforestation. Forests play an important role in the absorption of carbon dioxide through the process of photosynthesis. They also help in returning oxygen to the atmosphere, and as such, cutting down trees or reducing forest cover has negative effects on the environment Goldstein (2015). The third main cause of global warming is the destruction of marine ecosystems. Marine ecosystems such as oceans are carbon sinks, and they are responsible for absorption of up to 50 percent of carbon dioxide (Butler, 2018). However, when they are destroyed, their capacity to absorb carbon dioxide reduces resulting in ocean acidification and the death of fauna and flora. The other cause behind global warming is population increase. A rise in population puts pressure on natural resources thereby speeding up the increase in greenhouse gas emissions (United Nations, 2019).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Global Sourcing Model Name of Student Institutional Affiliation Global Sourcing Model Introduction In the past few years, the strong rivalry and globalization experienced in the world markets have forced several organizations to create strategies of international purchasing that encompass significant cost reductions, improvements in delivery and quality, enhanced cycle times, responsiveness to clients, and proper financial conditions. To be in a position of supporting their process of globalization, organizations have been compelled to seek strategies of globalization for their purchase management (Dhar, 2012). Most of the firms currently try to harness the prospective of sourcing in cost reduction. Therefore, it is true that global sourcing programs and initiatives form a critical part of the procurement strategy and strategic sourcing plan of most international organizations. Global sourcing is usually linked to a centralized procurement strategy for an international organization, in which a central purchasing organizations pursues economies of scale via corporate-wide benchmarking and normalisation. International procurement organizations might be a feature of global sourcing strategy for an organization. These organizations assume primary responsibility for the identification and development of main suppliers across various categories of sourcing and enable the satisfaction of intermittent sourcing needs of the parent company. These arrangements assist in offering the much needed focus on the country-based efforts of sourcing. Specifically, in the instance of large and complex nations like China where there is a range of sub-markets, there are suppliers spread all over the whole supply chain of an item; such international purchasing organizations offer critical on-the-ground information. This paper discusses the reasons for Compretudo purchasing their products from other countries like Qatar and India. Part A: Reasons for Compretudo’s Outsourcing
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Global Sourcing Model Name of Student Institutional Affiliation Global Sourcing Model Introduction In the past few decades, the strong rivalry and globalization experienced in the world markets have forced several organizations to create strategies of international purchasing that include considerable cost-cutting, delivery and quality enhancements, improved cycle times, customer responsiveness, and improved financial conditions. To be in a position of supporting their process of globalization, organizations have been compelled to seek strategies of globalization for their purchase management (Dhar, 2012). Most of the firms currently try to harness the prospective of sourcing in cost reduction. Therefore, it is true that projects of global sourcing are a vital part of the strategic sourcing plan as well as procurement strategy of most international organizations. Global sourcing is usually linked to a centralized procurement strategy for an international organization, in which a central purchasing organization pursues economies of scale via corporate-wide benchmarking and normalisation. International procurement organizations might be a feature of global sourcing strategy for an organization. These organizations assume primary responsibility for the identification and development of main suppliers across various categories of sourcing and enable the satisfaction of intermittent sourcing needs of the parent company. These arrangements assist in offering the much needed focus on the country-based efforts of sourcing. Specifically, in the instance of large and complex nations like China where there is a range of sub-markets, there are suppliers spread all over the whole supply chain of an item; these global sourcing organizations provide fundamental on-the-ground information. This paper discusses the reasons for Compretudo purchasing their products from other countries like Qatar and India. Part A: Reasons for Compretudo’s Outsourcing
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Global Learning Activity Name of Student Name of University Global Learning Activity These materials are significantly useful in writing the historical experience of those regions outside of Europe. They offer first-hand accounts about major historical events that shaped the history of regions outside Europe even though such events also had bearing on the European history. Equiano (1967) provides description of a major historical event in the 18th century- the Atlantic slave trade. He puts a human face to this event and demonstrates its human consequences particularly in West Africa region. It is based on this information that the English abolitionist movement was largely inspired to end slave trade in the United States. The material “A Sober and Wholesome Drink” contain crucial information about commodities that were produced through slave labor in the Middle East in late 16th century. It highlights the fact that whereas coffeehouses became prominent in European cities like London, the culture of drinking coffee can be traced back to the Middle East (Ellis, 2006). The authors of these documents had first-hand knowledge or interaction with the historical experiences of the regions outside of Europe, and therefore, they provided reliable and credible information that were relied upon in subsequent historical discourses on the issues that they discussed such as slavery and civilization. From the analyzed materials, it is evident that the regions outside of Europe were inextricably connected to the Atlantic System. Primarily, they were connected in the sense that they were the source of commodities and slaves that were instrumental in driving and sustaining the Atlantic system. Regions such as West Africa provided slaves and Middle East provided commodities like coffee. The need to ensure that the slaves and commodities from those regions are harnessed to build the European economy was important in advancing key features of the Atlantic system such as commerce and technology (Vernadsky, 1972). The civilizations and socio-political and economic advancements that could be attributed to the incorporation of those regions in the Atlantic System were important new secular, scientific and critical approach that is cited as the major impact of this system (Gay, 1973 & Astell, 1970). The Atlantic System constructed a colonial network between Europe, Africa and the Americas though a well-crafted infrastructure designed to facilitate this system. It bound Western Europe, the Americas and Western Europe. Slaves that were obtained from western Africa were sold by the Europeans and the proceeds from that trade was used in buying commodities that were produced by colonial plantations that had been established in the Caribbean, South America and North America (Equiano, 1967). Shipping companies from Europe made enormous profits by transporting slaves from West Africa to Europe and Americas. They also made profits by transporting and distributing agricultural products produced in Americas such as cotton and sugar to Europe. Besides, they transported manufactured goods, textiles and rum back to Africa. Through this triangular trade, Europe became strategically-positioned to consequently achieve a successful colonial regime in Americas and Africa where they established their political and social customs and institutions (Gay, 1973). It also helped them to evolve into industrial age characterized with robust economic activities (Ellis, 2006). References Astel, M. (1970). Some Reflections upon Marriage. Source Book Press.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Global Economy Name Institution Affiliation Date Global Economy Main purpose of the major post-WW2 global institutions as related to the global economy and their impact The Second World War impacted on issues that touch on the economic, political as well as social concerns during and after the war. Global institutions formed after WW2 such as the IMF, World Bank and the United Nations among others purposed to give guidance and help the world recover from the impacts of the wars and foster more peace initiatives globally. The IMF and the World Bank had the objective of helping countries that were negatively impacted by war reconstruct and rebuild infrastructure that would help them return to normalcy as quickly as possible and stabilize the global economy that had been greatly affected by the war. Their impact is positive as it has helped many countries and multinational corporations steady in post WW2 and as a result stabilize the world economy where countries such as Germany among others in Europe that were worst affected by the war recovered and to date are among the most stable global economies that form part of the G8 countries (Felsenstein, Schamp & Shachar, 2013). The institutions also exist to date offering more support to countries in the globe that empower them economically hence had a positive impact. The global effects of economic inequality on vulnerable populations (immigrants, women, etc) The global economic inequality impacts the vulnerable populations such as women and immigrants negatively further increasing the gap between the rich and the poor especially in most societies that have a bigger gap of wealth distribution. Vulnerable populations such as women have had less access to factors of production such as land and capital among others compelling them to provide only labor in the production process. The globalization effects on economic inequality, thus, has resulted in the increase of poverty, unemployment, lowered GDP and lower incomes of the vulnerable populations such as women and immigrants that have been forced to work and offer labor at rates below the global minimum standards (Erokhin, 2016). The inequalities have also led to the establishment of affirmative action’s that target to empower the vulnerable populations such as women empowerment by establishing funds that help them start businesses as well as engage in other economic activities. References Erokhin, V. (2016). Global perspectives on trade integration and economies in transition. Hershey, PA, USA: Business Science Reference. Felsenstein, D., Schamp, E. W., & Shachar, A. (2013). Emerging Nodes in the Global Economy: Frankfurt and Tel Aviv Compared. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Gettysbury Address / Emancipation Proclamation Alice Florence English 11 American Literature EHS 03/25/2018 Gettysbury Address / Emancipation Proclamation History plays an important role in the society that helps people understand past events, the present status quo, as well as help people, project the future by analyzing the past historical events. American history is rich that touches on many aspects such as civil war, slavery, democracy, and revolutionary war among others factors. Different leaders at the time and present have contributed to shaping the American and the world history at large. However, this paper explains how President Lincoln approached ending of the civil wars both practically and idealistically in Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation. President Lincoln address in the two incidences shows that he approached the subject objectively. He started by appreciating the past struggles and dreams of all those that advocated for civil liberties in the United States history as well as the world. He notes that their struggles should not be taken for granted and the only way to honor the departed as a result of the struggles of civil liberty is by completing their dreams by implementing a full automation of civil liberties in the United States. President Lincoln also used his constitutional powers and privileges as the president to enhance the civil liberties and freedom that impacted in the US history positively in many aspects. Lincoln, moreover, provided practical options and solutions that proved the changed status quo. For example, he says that formerly oppressed would now be free to join the armed services of the United States. He also directed responsible law enforcement at the time that includes the military and the naval forces to enhance the realization of such freedoms of the slaves. Lastly, the president included religion as the main factor that helped him deliver his historic message. He quoted severally phrases that link God to such freedoms and decision such as that all men are created equal before the eyes of God. In conclusion, Lincoln approach emphasized the use of practical and ideological approaches to pass his message of Emancipation Proclamation and Gettysburg Address.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Gerontology Name Institution Affiliation Date Gerontology Healthcare plays an important role in the society that ensures healthy nations and people able to engage in economic, social and political affairs productively. Many agree with the view that a healthy nation is a wealthy nation. Life is an experience that is unique that changes with age, hence, experiencing different health challenges. The population that is aging in many parts of the world that include Europe and the United States continues to rise prompting health caregivers to channel more resources to the aging population that touches on the sociology, biology and psychology concerns. However, this paper presents a brief description of the common chronic diseases of the old age. Adult-onset diabetes is among chronic disease affecting the elderly also referred to as Type 2 Diabetes. Lack of exercise and obesity are major causes of the metabolic disorder that is long-term that shows insulin disorder or levels of blood sugar higher than normal. Arthritis characterized by joint pains that can make the aged find difficulties in moving or climbing stairs is another common chronic disease of the old. Among common symptoms include swelling of joints, stiffness, and pain. Dementia is also another disease that is not a general disease but a general term that describes memory decline, for example, Alzheimer. It limits the aged to perform their daily activities (Vijaya & IGI Global, 2017). Glaucoma is also another common health challenge experienced by the aged that causes damage to the eyes optic nerves. It can result in vision loss and if not addressed on time result in total blindness. It often shows up later in life and maybe inherited making it difficult for healthcare givers to discover it on time. Lung disease is also known as a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) shown by symptoms of difficulty in a breathing and long cough. It results from damage to the lungs that trap air and causes many different disorders, for instance, pneumonia, lung cancer, and tuberculosis. Osteoporosis shown by weak and easy to break bones is also a common chronic disease of the old age. It may limit mobility and movements resulting in depression and isolation and experts encourage exercise during early ages as noted by Wilmoth and Ferraro (2013) piece. Finally, cardiovascular disease that affects the blood vessels and heart that might result in heart attack or stroke is common among the old age. Blood flow through the arteries is hard because they become narrow when plaque builds in the walls that in extreme cases might cause a blood clot. In conclusion, the old age experience diverse diseases. All stakeholders, hence, have a responsibility to prepare in advance in the best possible ways to intervene and help the old age manage different health challenges objectively. References Vijaya, P. B., & IGI Global. (2017). Chronic mental illness and the changing scope of intervention strategies, diagnosis, and treatment. Hershey, Pennsylvania (701 E. Chocolate Avenue, Hershey, PA 17033, USA): IGI Global. Wilmoth, J. M., & Ferraro, K. F. (2013). Gerontology: Perspectives and issues. New York: Springer.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Curriculum Vitae Gerry Gentile, MBA. 975 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 Email: doublegg100@gmail.com Wisconsin School of Business, University of Wisconsin-Madison Education Graduate Studies MBA. Brand and Product Management: Wisconsin School of Business, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2012. Major in Global Product Positioning and Brand Dominance Dissertation Title: “The essential role of product differentiation in global brand expansion: A case study of selected American brands market entry strategies in Africa and other emerging markets”Supervisors: Dr. David Graham (Chair), Dr. Paul Lindsay and Prof. Philip Kositany. Undergraduate Studies Bsc. Business Administration, Wisconsin School of Business- University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010 Core Subjects Covered: Utility Management, Strategic Decision-making, Corporate Governance, Social Corporate Responsibility, and Stakeholder Management. Minors in Accounting and Management Science Class Rank: 2:1 Employment/Work Background Positions Held Tutorial Assistant: Marketing Research, Product & Brand Management, Wisconsin School of Business, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2014–Present Customer Relations Officer: Baird’s Equity Capital Markets Group, Milwaukee, WI, 2016 Academic Research Expert/Qualitative Research Analyst, One Freelance Ltd, 2012-Present Teaching and Research Interests Strategic Human Resource Management, Multinational Expansion Potential in Emerging Economies, Management in a Multicultural Environment Honors, Fellowships, and Grants 2016, Exemplary Performance as a Teaching Assistant, Wisconsin School of Business, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Gender and Sexual Orientation Name Institution Affiliation Gender and Sexual Orientation Introduction The society experiences different aspects that show differences in humanity such as religion, race, gender, socio-economic status, language as well other cultural and ethnic differences practiced in the society. The reactions towards the differences noted above also differ in the society wherein the present times it has continued to establish or break relationships because of the meanings and perception that people have about differences exhibited by humanity. Gender and sexual debates in recent times have continued to impact and influence societal decisions and actions in the spheres of politics, economics as well as social aspects in life. The gender discrepancies noted in many parts of society that has long roots and relationship that dominated the past societies where the male gender dominated most of the issues in the society. The civil society mainly that supports feminism and reforms in the change aspects related to human rights have tried to institute changes of the status quo and empower women to help and bridge the gap that has existed in most societies for a long time through affirmative action in the society in all sectors of life. However, this paper presents variables in gender, and sexual orientation that I have learned and changes noted during the course as well as provide possible solutions and implications that the issues might have in the future. Analysis Description of the New Information Learned The course has enabled learning of new terminologies related to the topic of gender and sexual orientation that I had not previously encountered. They include Cisgender, Transgender, agender binary, non-binary issues, gender, genderfluid, genderqueer and pangender among many others. The new terminologies have been extensively defined and included in many examples and presentation of the different concepts related to the subject of gender and sexual orientation presented in the semester. The Introduction of medical perception about the subject and issue of gender and sexual orientation also brought a different dynamic and understanding regarding the topic. It enabled me to understand the reasoning and views that the health experts have relating to the subject that touches on various issues that include the LGBT group. Many people in the society often have viewed the LGBT group as having possibly mental challenges and psychological problems that have led them to go against the norm in matters relating to gender and sexual orientation (Green, Rimes & Rahman, 2018). The medical perceptions and medical terminology that describes the topics and related issues such as Gender Dysphoria, puberty suppression, and medical transition among others that tried to explain the disconnection that people have between their biological sex and gender identity where some people have been attracted to the same gender and interests. It has puzzled and challenged them and many others to know and understand the possible reasons prompting them to seek medical and professional inquiry form the pharmaceutical sector. The different social perception and reaction toward the subject of gender and sexual orientation also had in-depth information and knowledge about the subject. Some of the social responses include the daily encounters that people meet in life, but more often they assume and do not note and give them the attention that it deserves. They relate to gender such as the use of pronouns, sharing of their gender and sexual issue with friends and family members as well as in other public places that require gender identification that might also include official changing of names and identification. The impact that LGBTQ populations have encountered in the society cuts across all aspects and spheres of life that include social, economic as well as political. The group has been denied opportunities in the military, schools admissions and work opportunities, political platforms as well as other economic opportunities in life (Human Rights.Org, nd). The results are that the level of suicide and other healthcare challenges related to stress and discrimination that such groups experience has contributed to the rising number of death that such groups experience. Social isolation, poverty, homelessness, and poverty have continued to characterize the LGBTQ groups in the society that has impacted and continued to affect them negatively. The gender and sexual orientation groups in the society, however, continue to note increased support as shown in the political process. They try to establish policies and rules that eliminated gender discrimination of all the people including the LGBTQ groups and also enhancing their recognition in life. Gender messages are conveyed in the society using different approaches and factors that starts right from childhood ages. The playing kits and tools used by the different genders start to convene the roles and responsibilities anticipated from the different genders in the future. The messages transmitted to the public and other groups that subscribe to different gender uses both verbal and non-verbal clues of communication that support masculinity and femininity of gender issues and sexual orientation. The non-verbal clues that gender and sexual orientation are displayed include hairstyle, clothing, tattoos, make-up, facial hair, gestures and vocal pitch among others. The freedom of expression that many democratic societies have and also the support that the social media platforms have provided has made it possible for gender and sexual orientation to openly express their positions including the LGBTQ group among others (Bőthe et al., 2018). Description of Former Information That I Had The information that I had regarding gender and sexual orientation was only limited to the two genders as presented in the conservative position and the LGBT group primary concerns. And particularly the struggle for recognition and respect that has dominated many of the media houses including mainstream media as well as social services. The information that I had before the course lacked the perception and views that the medical profession has regarding the subject and topic of gender and sexual orientation. It also required the approaches and messages that express the topic right from childhood as well as the information that tries and express identity concerning the subject that I encounter on a daily basis, but I have not taken interests and concern such as those that related and point to sexual and gender orientation aspects. Discussion on the Way(S) In Which the New Information Is Different The new information is different because it has provided an objective view and analysis from different perceptions and professionals that include the expert’s opinions and analysis of the subject such as medical professions among others. It, hence, provides a balanced view and approach that also notes how the different groups that subscribe to different sexual categories including the LGBTQ groups are impacted in the economic, social as well as political aspects among others. It, therefore, empowers one with information that can be used to present a convincing discussion and debate relating to the subject and topic of gender and sexual orientation. It might try to institute changes and reforms in the society that determines how the concerns are addressed. For example, the negative impacts such as increased deaths and suicide among the LGBTQ groups is a concern that needs to be addressed in the soonest times possible as they constitute an essential part of the society that needs to be protected and respected irrespective of their sexual preferences and choices. Where We Go From Here Public information and education would play an essential role that would empower all concerned stakeholders in the subject of gender and sexual orientation in society. It is on actions that they can take and how they can contribute positively in addressing the negative consequences and effects that might result from the different sex exhibited from gender and sexual differences in the society. Adams (2017) notes that reforms need to be taken that would eliminate structures in the society that enhanced oppressions and discrimination of the different genders and groups that include the LGBTQ among others to strengthen freedom and democratic choices of people as well as the respect of human rights as many people would prefer. What Can Be Done To Solve the Issue? The issue needs to be addressed objectively by taking different actions by different stakeholders. For example, in political solutions, politicians need to formulate laws and policies that would guide gender and sexual orientation concerns in all aspects of society. It includes opportunities in the economic and social elements that eliminate discrimination and exclusion of people from different genders and sexual orientation. They also need to formulate policies that guide investors and business on the actions that they need to take relating to concerns of gender and sexual orientation in the society that might include employment opportunities and business transactions with different individual and other companies. The society also needs to incorporate gender and sexual orientation education in the subject and courses that they offer in the institutions to empower the masses with information that would enhance them making positive decisions and taking actions that results in both holistic outcomes and returns in the society (Blondeel et al., 2018). What We Might Hear About This Issue In The Future The future potential debates and discussions about gender and sexual orientation would be opened where many of the sexually oriented groups that subscribe to different ideologies and perception contrary to the norms in the society such as the LGBTQ groups would be more appreciated and respected. They would openly express their position relating to the subject and topic of gender and sexual orientation (Green, Rimes & Rahman, 2018). The social media platforms, as well as other mainstream media platforms, would play an essential role in instituting such changes due to enhanced freedom and options of communication availed in the future. Conclusion In conclusion, the gender and sexual orientation topic have brought essential ideas and concepts that different concerns regarding the subject can be viewed and analyzed objectively. It is always accessible and faster to critique and judge the various issues in society that go against the conservative and perceived norms and gender, and sexual orientation is no exemption. The subject, thus, needs an objective view and analysis that would present a balanced approach that issues and concerns related to the topic would be addressed in the short and long-term to empower all concerned stakeholders that include the public, the government as well as the private sector. References
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    IN NARROW DECISION, SUPREME COURT SIDES WITH BAKER WHO TURNED AWAY GAY COUPLE (NEW YORK TIMES, JUNE 4, 2018) Name Class Date Introduction Despite the existing constitutional protection for gay marriages, federal and state laws continue to sustain legal loopholes or exemptions that discriminate against gays and lesbians under the guise of religious or free speech freedoms. Such exemptions perpetuate an intolerant culture against this special population and expose them to undue indignation in public places. The case of Phillips a Colorado baker who refused to sell a wedding cake to a gay couple manifests the persisting institutional and societal intolerance and violence against the LGBT community. a). Summary of the Case The case of Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission arose from a confrontation between a gay couple, Charlie Craig and David Mullins and Mr. Philip, a Colorado Cakeshop proprietor. The gay couple booked a cake from Phillips for their planned wedding in Colorado but Mr. Philip declined their request, citing his religious disapproval of gay marriages. In response, the gay couple filed a complaint against Mr. Phillips with the Colorado Civil Rights Commission citing discrimination and violation of their constitutionally protected right. The Civil Rights Commission and state courts agreed with the gay couple, citing gay marriage as a constitutionally protected right and dismissing religious orientation as sufficient basis for discrimination against constitutional rights. The Colorado Appellate Court further held that accepting to design the cake for the gay couple could not violate Mr. Phillips’ rights to free speech because the couple did not gag him from voicing his opinion against gay marriages in other forums. However, the Supreme Court of the United States in a seven-to-two majority opinion sided with Mr. Phillips, noting that while the constitution protects gay marriages, the Colorado Civil Rights Commission through the remarks of its members had shown hostility to Mr. Phillips’ religious beliefs and appeared dismissive of his equally protected constitutional right to free speech. Justice Kennedy, who penned the majority opinion, was particular that while the court recognizes and upholds the constitutional protection for gay marriages, it was equally persuaded that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had erred in showing obvious disrespect and disdain for Mr. Phillips genuine religious beliefs1 Liptak, A. 2018. “In a Narrow Decision, Supreme Court Sides with Baker who turned Away Gay couple.” The New York Times, 4 June 2018. . b). Argument against the Decision This decision went against the spirit of the constitution and subjected the gay marriages to varied interpretation despite the already established constitutional safeguards. The decision failed to assert the court’s position on the constitutional right to same sex marriage and the extent to which a government could exercise a regulatory authority over businesses operated on religious principles, especially where such principles violate constitutional rights. The court further based its interpretation of violations of free speech to the comments of a member of the Colorado Civil Rights Commission against Phillips, contending that such comments had comprised religious intolerance and disrespect for Mr. Phillips free speech right. I find this to be materially erroneous because the court deliberately chose to focus on the views of the Civil Rights Commission rather than delving into the facts that originated the case. In my view, the court had a responsibility to uphold the constitutional protection for gay marriages in the ratio decindendi of the decision and only advance the argument for religious tolerance in the addendum. The hostile and dismissive comments from a member of the Civil Rights Commission against Phillips genuine religious beliefs was wrong as it perpetuated religious intolerance and infringed on his free speech guarantees but it did not materially outweigh the constitutional protection for gay marriages or the precedent in Obergefell v. Hodges (2015). Most importantly, the decision underscored a biased position in the debate between the people who oppose gay marriages on religious grounds and those who accept gay marriages as essential human rights.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Game of Thrones (2011-Present) Name Institution Affiliation Date Game of Thrones (2011-Present) Music plays an important role in the society that provides entertainment and passes different messages to listeners. It is also used in the production of video games, films and television shows. However, this paper shows how instrumental (program) music is used in the Games of Thrones TV show to help establish the story. Description of the TV Show (Game of Thrones) The television series is fantasy drama filmed in many places in Europe and the United States. It was created by Weiss and Benioff. The story talk about the dynastic noble families that struggle to control the throne and as a result try to form alliances and conflict that try to free their families from the throne. The subsequent parts show how a previously exiled family member try to return to the throne and finally, the closing parts show how realm is defended against creatures considered to be legends as well as people who threaten the realm and also a harsh climate. How the Instrumental Music Established the Mood or Told the Story The instrumental or program music feature in many parts of the show that supplement the message or theme presented at any particular time. It provides sonnet that enables viewers to relate and create an extra-musical image in their view (Collins, 2014). For example, the program music played when the main characters want to engage in war or conflict makes them reflect and prepare mentally for such conflict. Some of the program music makes the key actors reflect and think about the past as they convey and carry different messages that supplement the theme or message displayed by the major characters at any one particular time. The program music, thus, enables viewers to anticipate an event in the story that create the moods in the story not only among chief actors as well as viewers. It enabled the transition of parts easily understood as the program music changed with themes and sonnet that made telling the story easy. Cello was the instrument that stood out as it resonates well with the theme of the story as a classic instrument. It shows when the key characters reflected deeply about the message that the program music instrument laid to them. The show is a classic show and, consequently, such a classic instrument resonated well and helps tell the story better (Cury, 2017). There is a specific music associated with the major actors, especially the leaders of the different groups that lead the conflicts as main characters. The music elements such as tempo, melody, and rhythm change with the mood. It depicts the intensity, for instance, of the conflicts or engagements of the actors in the story. In conclusion, instrumental music used in TV program and video game continues to rise. It enables the easy transition of different themes and actions in the programs as noted in the Game of Thrones piece. It establishes mood of the story that enables easy understanding of the piece.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    A Review of Children of Dust: A Memoir of Pakistan Name of Student Name of University A Review of Children of Dust: A Memoir of Pakistan The book Children of the Dust is divided into five sections, which is about the journey of young Ali, through phases of life and how he evolves with time. On reading the book, I got an exposure into the difficulties faced by the protagonist and the conflict faced, by him to find his identity and to resist the manipulations that are present in the complicated, political, religious backgrounds that we all have. Ali Eteraz had journeyed from Pakistan to USA and he has recounted his experiences in a humorous yet strong way , where the underlying concepts of practices of the faith of Islam has been shown in a very different light from the usual way that Islamic literature oriented books are written. This memoir written by Ali Eteraz is heart wrenching. He shows an attempt to align the ideals taught by the teachings of Islam with the practices that have high levels of hypocrisy and physical brutality that he encountered in his attempt to be true to his promise of being “ the servant of Islam” as promised by his father to Allah. The first section delves into his life in Pakistan, he is born and named Abir ul Islam, and he grows up amongst stories of Quran as told to him by his mother and is mesmerised by them. His grandmother’s influence is also profound, who doles out regular children’s tales to influence him to take up memorizing the Quran and become a hafiz- e-Quran. He was quickly admitted to the Madrassa on his brother’s death and his near death experience, from typhoid. This is where he encounters the hypocrisy associated by the practice, as regular beatings to teach obedience, made him rebel. The second section is associated with their move to America, yet sticking to the original orthodox society even in the new land of promise and hope. Abir starts to explore the new world like a child and keeps on negotiating with his teachings while watching episodes of Boy meets world on television , exposing him to a fresh take of the world. The story further gives an insight into the changes in him after reading sonnets sent to him by Una , through these he gains an insight to being a true Muslim , even though he defies the age old practices and baggage associated with Islam. While reading the third section, Amir is grieved over Una’s abandonment; he then shares room with another orthodox Muslim Moosa Farid and they develop an orthodox approach to life, they neither drink nor make merry, while always concentrating on living as per the practices prescribed in Quran. Both of them were watching “The Siege” where suicide bombers were considered as devout Muslims, Amir clearly was confused and felt the same confusion among his fellow mates. Amir also traces his family back to its roots to Abu Bakr Siddiq, his exposure to Salman Rushdie’s Satanic Verses, leaves him in a more confused state, he is unable to burn the book as it is thought provoking and Rushdie’s thoughts and questions had already started to germinate a seed of doubt. In the book, Amir, has mixed feelings daily with his rising sexual needs and his wish to also remain pious as per the dictates of the religion. While reading the book I can feel his desperation to get married, where he understands that, his family will not accept any of the girls Kara or Bilquis. He understands that such a personal choice is not permissible in his culture and agrees to travel to Karachi in search of a bride. This is where he is encountered by a rude awakening , where he understands that he is not considered a brother , by the people , because of his western background considered infidel and not pious. The fourth part of the book takes the reader on the journey of Amir’s life as he feels liberated with post modernism concepts. He experiences the wave of sexual freedom; he becomes the president of the Muslim Student Association, which is associated with power in the Christian University of Atlanta. He abandons his stance as the prince of Islam and decides to journey to Kuwait , to fulfil his design as a reformer of Islamic practices. The final book is the most important aspect of this memoir; it is punctuated with many epiphanies that the protagonist passes through. Notably, Amir changes his name to Ali Eteraz, which means the reformer. By this time, he has lost all, his career, money and his family and lives with Ziad. His host has a profound impact on his life and his thoughts; he goes into a journey of experiences and self- discovery. On reading further, Ali encounters many feelings with incidents such as kite flying, which signals his personal conception of liberation. This chapter of the book portrays Islam as a peaceful religion, a religion of love, quite distinct from the contemporary depictions and practice of Islam, especially in the Middle Eastern countries. He goes on a self-discovery journey. Ali completely submerges himself in the musical ruminations of Sufi music and musical celebrations of the Pakistani workers. He enjoys the teachings of Rumi and there is a deep-seated realisation in him, where he understands the depths of the religion in its purest form, which talks of one-ness with God and has no inclination towards any sects. Amir’s awakening is symbolic of Islamic fundamentalists seeing the world in a new light. The book is a well written, eye opening account of a small boy, who is born in Pakistan and travels to America. The journey talks about his transformations and experiences during his childhood, where he is Abir-ul Islam (perfume of essence of Islam), the name as given to him, he is a follower, until beatings and unfair practices make him rebel. The next phase of the book, took me through the journey of Amir, who considers his self to be a prince of Islam, when he is in conflict with his teachings and his surroundings, where his surroundings are continuously, overpowering the illogical practices that had become the practice, in most orthodox society. This is what makes him try to reform, the Islamic society. In the last part of the book, he is seen to take the name of Ali , who is the reformer. The final leg of the Journey is about his realisations and revelations as a traveller wanting to change; his life is transformed by influences of Ziad, and he is seen to embrace the meanings of Rumi’s poetry and opens his minds to the real essence of inclusive practices of Islam. The book is thought provoking and insightful. On reading the book, my realisation has been that it is important to embrace our age-old traditions, but shed the political, and other social baggage that have encumbered the true sense associated with this. It is important to embrace concepts of traditional practices, but also to have understanding that those ancient traditions emerged in different times and different circumstances, calling for the need to embrace contemporary world practices. The traditions of Confucianism and Islam have much conflict with the current practices of human rights and democracy. The Confucianism, philosophy is associated with political considerations of those times and its practices were initially rigid, however in the post- Mao era its philosophies as currently practiced have undergone a sea change. It is into promoting a harmonious society where there is stress on mastery over self and over one’s desires, rather than trying others to practice the age-old traditions of the bygone years. Confucianism revolves around the concept of cultural practices, however in today’s world, it has shed such associations and is practiced more on the lines of Buddhist approaches of self –discovery, rather than on imposing, cultural practices. In the case of Islam as well, there are trends associated with the concepts of newer associations of oneness with God, rather than social and moral policing that justify religious malpractices. It is being observed that young people in the western world, have taken up Islamic traditions in their own personal ways ,they have also started to find voice in the essence of human rights and in democratic approaches that is prevalent in the society. In this story , it is clearly observed on my reading experience is that , Ali transforms through experiences and he embraces a much more humanity based aspect of Islam , and understands its core values of love and unity , not necessarily with Muslims only , but with the whole universe. This is where new practices emerge. The readings of Rumi’s poetry and Ali’s journey from his confused childhood, to his epiphanies and realisations, he embraces the American practices and realises that the practices of Islam in its original state is not in conflict with the current life of the west. He becomes a much more informed, conscious and loving Muslim, who is away from the hypocrisy attached to the medieval practices and is in unity with God.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Geography
    Full Life Cycle Staffing Name University Full Life Cycle Staffing Introduction The company that I have contacted is Shelton Plumbing, which is located in Waco, Texas. The human resources professional that I contacted is Creig Little, who is the human resources manager for All Safe Fire Protection Company. The company operates in the service industry especially in the commercial restaurant restorations. When I was contacting Creig Little, I called and spoke to a woman named Connie, the receptionist. The receptionist transferred the call to Mr. Little. During the call, I explained to Mr. Little that I am an A&M student. I also explained to Mr. Little the details of my assignment. Mr. Little assured me that I could make an appointment with him at any time. Enlisting is not as straightforward as getting a new line of work looking for individual, getting them to apply, and putting them in the vacant position. When you are employed to take care of an occupation request, there are distinctive advanced strategies associated with making an arrangement. Full cycle enrolling begins with tolerating a vocation request and finishes when the customer onboard an applicant you found. Full cycle selecting is the enlistment procedure from beginning to end. A various advance task closes in an effective occupation arrangement. Ventures in the process incorporate sourcing and talking competitors (Brown, 2011). An employing specialist, similar to a selection representative, who is a piece of the enrolling procedure at all times full enlistment life cycle. Most activity orders you get will be full cycle enlisting since you do not redistribute ventures of the activity position process. Do not hesitate to make an enlistment work process outline to keep you responsible. Receive Job Order from a Client The initial step of full life cycle enrolling is to get the activity request from your customer. Your customer should give you a nitty gritty expected set of responsibilities with the activity request so you comprehend what you are searching for. In the event that your customer's expected set of responsibilities does not obviously address the sort of position, individual required, or capabilities, you may need to re-compose it. The expected set of responsibilities ought to have the activity title, pay extend, perfect hopeful points of interest, and a rundown of the activity. Re-composing the set of working responsibilities may take some forward and backward among you and your customer, however it is essential. You will not almost certainly carry out your responsibility effectively and draw in the correct applicants if the expected set of responsibilities is messy. When you get an occupation request from your customer, alongside an expected set of responsibilities you can work with, you can move onto the following stage. Search and Recruit Candidates When you have an occupation request, you can begin your look for applicants. Set aside some effort to recognize the perfect hopeful you are looking for. Sourcing competitors does not need to be unimaginable. There are wide ranges of ways you can discover competitors: Use enlisting programming: Look for hopefuls inside your selecting database. Post on online employment sheets: Since 79% of occupation, looking for Americans use online assets to quest for new employment put the expected set of responsibilities online to draw in more hopefuls. Join web based life: As a feature of your web based life enrolling procedure, post the expected set of responsibilities on social stages to give uninvolved applicants (a chance to people who aren't effectively work looking) think about the open employment. Go to vocation fairs: Make vis-à-vis associations with occupation seekers at enrolling organizing occasions and gather resumes (Tegze, 2017). Occasionally, your customer needs a competitor with explicit aptitudes. Sourcing an A-level applicant is going to take some additional time than finding only any competitor. Qualified competitors are bound to get numerous activity offers and have diverse organizations enrolling them. It may require more exertion selecting choice competitors and persuading them to work for your customer.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    General Knowledge
    Global Economy Name Institution Affiliation Date Global Economy Main purpose of the major post-WW2 global institutions as related to the global economy and their impact The Second World War impacted on issues that touch on the economic, political as well as social concerns during and after the war. Global institutions formed after WW2 such as the IMF, World Bank and the United Nations among others purposed to give guidance and help the world recover from the impacts of the wars and foster more peace initiatives globally. The IMF and the World Bank had the objective of helping countries that were negatively impacted by war reconstruct and rebuild infrastructure that would help them return to normalcy as quickly as possible and stabilize the global economy that had been greatly affected by the war. Their impact is positive as it has helped many countries and multinational corporations steady in post WW2 and as a result stabilize the world economy where countries such as Germany among others in Europe that were worst affected by the war recovered and to date are among the most stable global economies that form part of the G8 countries (Felsenstein, Schamp & Shachar, 2013). The institutions also exist to date offering more support to countries in the globe that empower them economically hence had a positive impact. The global effects of economic inequality on vulnerable populations (immigrants, women, etc) The global economic inequality impacts the vulnerable populations such as women and immigrants negatively further increasing the gap between the rich and the poor especially in most societies that have a bigger gap of wealth distribution. Vulnerable populations such as women have had less access to factors of production such as land and capital among others compelling them to provide only labor in the production process. The globalization effects on economic inequality, thus, has resulted in the increase of poverty, unemployment, lowered GDP and lower incomes of the vulnerable populations such as women and immigrants that have been forced to work and offer labor at rates below the global minimum standards (Erokhin, 2016). The inequalities have also led to the establishment of affirmative action’s that target to empower the vulnerable populations such as women empowerment by establishing funds that help them start businesses as well as engage in other economic activities. References Erokhin, V. (2016). Global perspectives on trade integration and economies in transition. Hershey, PA, USA: Business Science Reference. Felsenstein, D., Schamp, E. W., & Shachar, A. (2013). Emerging Nodes in the Global Economy: Frankfurt and Tel Aviv Compared. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    film
    Freud, Psychoanalysis, and the Feminine Name of Student Name of University Freud, Psychoanalysis, and the Feminine Psychoanalysis is a theory of the unconscious, which links subjectivity and sexuality. It discloses ways in which the sense of self, attachment, and political loyalties are ordered by symbolic structures and influenced by unconscious drives, which are beyond the influence of individual agency. Thus, the alliance between psychoanalysis and feminism are coordinated on treacherous grounds. This is evident in Sigmund Freud’s arguments on feminism. In his discussion of the riddle of femininity and sexual differentiation, Freud dismissed women as the problem. This discussion of femininity by Freud exposes his biases against women. Thus, it is possible to impeach Freud as a sexist based on his idea of femininity and his description of women. However, feminist theories have undertaken a serious focus of Freud and came up with careful analysis of the fundamental concepts, possibilities, limits, and impasses. Important advances have been made in psychoanalysis in an attempt to improve an understanding of women. Based on these improvements, psychoanalysis can still support female analysis, healing, and recovery. Psychoanalysis is not representative of a static and unified body of practice or theory. Instead, it has changed over the years since the original discoveries made by Sigmund Freud. Modifications and developments have been made in all areas of psychoanalysis including research, theory, and therapy. Most importantly, psychoanalytic theories on women have undergone numerous changes. Even though most of Freud’s patients were women, his only focus when it came to women was the complaints and disorders that other physicians dismissed. Freud’ theories were demeaning and critical of women. For instance, Julia Sheehy (2012) notes that Freud attributed he passive nature of women to having wombs that awaited impregnation. Freud argued this way because his sexism enabled him to reduce women by relating their passiveness to a biological organ. This idea about women was challenged by women who sought to free women from the biological reductionism of Freud. One of the ways in which these women succeeded in challenging the biological reductionism favored by Sigmund Freud were to emphasize ad relate their passive nature to the social restrictions and pressures that molded women. Freudian psychoanalysis and his dismissal and impeachment of women can be attributed to his lack of information. This can be outlined through a review of his work in light of new information that was not available to him. Over the years, different areas of information have been developed, which can be used to challenge Freud’s sexism and his opinions towards women. These areas include empirical studies of the mother-infant relations and interactions and their impact towards the competencies of an infant, anthropology findings on the culture and nature of humans, and discoveries of the rapid eye movement. The other two areas of information are the psychology of sex differences and the function of emotions during social communications. The discovery of the sexual differentiation based on the chromosomal basis was made after Freud’s psychoanalysis of sexual differentiation and development. Advancements in anthropology since Freud’s era outline errors in the findings of Freud that women are socially inferior. However, empirical findings from the study by Berry (1976), Witkin, Goodenough, and Oltman (1979) show the existence of sex differences in cognitive styles. Findings from the study shows that women in most societies are field-dependent when compared to men. Freud used the social inferiority of women as part of his milieu and he tied it to sexual differentiation. One of the significant and experimental findings that have emerged since Freud is the sexual differentiation in primates, which ties the primate susceptibility to maternal deprivation in other social behaviors. Even though evidence from a culture species is not as equivocal as evidence from non-human primates, there are suggestions that human male infants are subject to an inconsolable state than female infants. This means that mothers have a difficult time consoling or pacifying male infants. Experimental findings show the possibility of genetic and intrinsic hormonal differences, which are linked to sex differences, which make females infants resistant to maternal deprivation. The better sociability of women cannot only be rested on the genetic-hormonal basis for maternal behavior. It can also be rested on the androcentric attitudes that prevail in scientific attitudes towards the sex differences. There seems to be an acceptance of the genetic basis for the aggression in men. This basis is related to the fact that genetics control hormones in males and females. However, the same is not accorded during the discussion of the nurturing behaviors of women. Even though there is no genetic basis for the nurturing behavior in women, it is universally accepted that women are nurturing. Another area of information that was absent during Freud’s time is the cultural nature of humanity. According to anthropological studies, humans are organized into cultures. Even though culture has numerous facets, it is universal that humans are organized in societies, which are governed by laws. It is vital to note that the content of morality in these societies varies. However, moral laws are immanent in culture and in the human nature that develops within a society. Freud was one of the initial psychoanalysts to anchor morality on biology. This led him to see the morality of humanity as an advancement over Darwin’s original horde. According to Freud, the origin of guilt is in evolutionary biology and not in the role of a mother’s nurturance during the process of forming guilt. Freud’s neglect of the interactions between a mother and infant in theories of moral development afflict his theories of women morality. Freud’ notion of maternal love shows a clinical prediction that is linked to the works of Harlow and Mears (1979). It is important to pay a tribute to Freud’s anticipation of the inspired observation of the association between adult sexuality and affectional interaction. During his theorization of a sexual instinct, Freud assumed that sexual development had a negative impact on the development of ego. Recent findings in studies on sexual development show that Freud’s assumptions are better when his statements are turned upside down. In this case, faulty ego development, which is social development negatively, influenced sexual behavior. Recent findings on sexual behaviors argue that sexual behavior together with learning skills, curiosity, and other primate behaviors are based on social relationships. Studies by Rheingold (1969) and Stone, Murphy, and Smith (1973) prove that infants are more competent and social than previously thought. Human infants are equipped to respond and sense people. They are also differentially responsive to the calls of other infants. The mother and infant attachment system is based on mutual advantages, which serve to secure the infant. Studies on the mother and infant relations suggest that a secure self evolves from a mutual delight in the company of a mother and infant. Currently, theories of mother-infant relations suggest that the problems of human development are not as Freud theorized when he stated that infant polymorphous original narcissist could become social creatures. Rather it is on how narcissists can develop from originally social-able beings. Current theories suggest that altruism is an inherent part of the human nature, which is mediated by empathy. The discovery of REM is also an important area that can be used to discount Freud’s theories of psychoanalysis. Discrepancies between Freud’s clinical insights and the weaknesses of his meta-psychology were outlined by the discovery of REM. REM provided an opportunity for psychologists to discover that dreaming occurs approximately four times a night regardless of the emotional state of a person. This was a blow to Freud’s theory of dreaming, which postulated that dreaming usually occurred as a sporadic affair. An important outcome of seeing humans as fundamentally creature is that emotions that separate and bind people become primary motivational factors in human behaviors. This is a modern theory of emotions, which was not present during Freud’s time. Emotions that originate in a social matrix comprise of a communicative function and an individual arousal function. The communicative function makes emotions complex cognitive operation that offers control and feedback of affective states. Emotional states involve the implied communication to other people even though individual arousal is high. Conversely, in Freud’s argument, symptoms arise from emotional conflicts. Research suggests that emotions play a crucial part in the motivation, organization, and sustenance of behavior. Despite Freudian sexist approach towards women in psychoanalysis, the field can still support female analysis. However, this is possible through the application of modern psychoanalysis. Modern feminist spawned new information and investigation in Freudian psychology. One of the new information areas that can be used to advance women psychoanalysis is the input of cultural and societal forces into the being of a woman. These forces relate to the condition of women. Psychoanalysis is a potent force in shaping the destinies and lives of women. In most of the instances, women seek psychoanalysis and the derivatives of psychoanalysis to treat emotional ills. In recent times, they seek psychoanalysis to gain information of what they are and should be. In different stages of the development of psychoanalysis, it has helped women raise their children and gain an understanding of their self. Psychoanalysis has advanced his concepts of gender roles, which are reified in cements of scientific authority. However, it has been crowded with theories that are biased against women and advance men superiority. By picking Freud’s statements, it is easy to bash him as the leading misogynist of all time. This is not productive especially in attempts to use psychoanalysis as a field for female analysis. Instead, it is important to give psychoanalysis a scrutiny and study based on emerging information and knowledge in different areas of human studies. There is success in illuminating the deleterious effect it has on women. It is important to note that close study and scrutiny of Freud era psychoanalysis has provided modern psychoanalysis with an invigoration, which has made it ideal for supporting female analysis, healing and recovery. It is also important to acknowledge the role that women have played in the development of psychoanalysis. Women have taken a leadership role and provided vital insights that concern a broad area of psychoanalysis including human development, parenting, gender, and interpersonal relations. Review of an essay by Robert Seidenberg (1991) highlights the relationship between Freud and women. One of the striking revelations made by Seidenberg (1991) is that Freud considered his mother as a tyrant. His mother appeared as a devoted woman that cared for her children. She also lavished inordinate concern and attention on her golden child. However, in the calculus of Freud’s psychoanalysis, this show of love reflected the mother’s hostility and anger, which he ultimately felt. Freud never became aware of his rage towards his mother and the grievances towards her were displaced on other women. He consciously continued his idealization of his mother, which he used as the idealization of all women. One of the ways in which psychoanalysis can be used to advance female healing and recovery is its support of women attempts to accept and reclaim the authority to live in a patriarchal women. The therapies devised in psychoanalysis that support female healing and recovery are based on Jungian psychology, which highlight ego development and the object relations theory. According to Seidenberg (1991), psychoanalysis can support female analysis through its diverse therapies. It can help in female recovery by teaching female clients how to develop competencies that are important in interpersonal relations. This will enable the female patient to stop the endless internalization of the personal agitations, stresses, and needs of others as if they were dependent on her. Hence, the female client will stop taking efforts to soothe others because of their personal needs and stresses. The therapies of psychoanalysis also help the female client to recognize the meaning of their individual animus complex as threatening or alien to the mother-daughter symbiosis. This means that it will aid the client in recognizing that she imagines herself to be evil, flawed, shameful, guilty, or dirty for the suffering of a mother. Psychoanalysis can also help women to increase or develop their self-esteem through the evaluation of their competencies in performing ordinary tasks such as the concern for the environment or caregiving. Additionally, it can give a female client a variety of learning skill and tasks through which she can establish contact with the masculine authority at home and in other settings. In her study, Ruth Lax (1995) critically examined Freud’s view of femininity and female psychosexual development. Freudian psychosexual analysis seems to have patriarchal biases in the manner in which he analyzed women and the objectives thy set for the psychoanalysis of women. From the 1950s to the 1970s, feminism reexamined the accepted Freudian postulates with the psychoanalytic establishments. It is interesting to note that Freudian psychoanalysis told women what they are and what they are supposed to be. In contrast, modern psychoanalysis has attempted to listen to women during their analysis. There is an importance to the analysis of the pathological conformity to stereotypes that are gender-based and to gender mythologies. They determine the external realities in which men and women live and also the shape and content of the psychic world of each gender. Thus the social relations and object relations introjected in the infant psyche of a girl gives rise to the infantile mythologies that make a male child superior to a female child. Freud’s view of a woman’s psychic world and its effect on the analysis of women influences a woman understanding of their structure, psychosexuality, and nature. This has a negative effect on the use of psychoanalysis in the analysis of women. Thus, Lax (1995) calls for a reexamination and rethink of Freud’s theories. Rethink and reexamination of Freud’s theories can contribute to a change in the therapeutic approaches, which can also contribute to an improved or better use of psychoanalysis in supporting women in their healing and recovery. There is a need to emphasize for an accurate and evolving understanding of the psychic nature and psychosexuality of women. There is also an emphasis of social and cultural factors in the being of a woman. For instance, Freud emphasized on the role of biology, anatomy, and constitution in arguing for the inferiority of women. However, he neglected the role of social and familial contributions in the development of a woman. Freud maintained that for a woman, anatomy is their destiny. This type of psychoanalysis is not ideal in supporting female analysis, healing, and recovery. Instead, it focuses on making women compliant and dependent. This led to a situation in which a female patient was seen to be more dependent and compliant, and less defiant and aggressive compared to a male patient. Thus, a woman patient was more likely to establish a strong and less wavering object cathexis to a male analyst. Freudian psychoanalysis implied that a female patient wanted to be an ideal patient for the analyst and she wanted to be loved. This led to the development of an erotic conveyance with the male analysts, which was considered as commonplace. Freud’s depiction of a female patient was never challenged nor questioned. Previously, it was held that male psychic structure and development were central to theoretical formulations. Thus, psychoanalysis described humans based on the viewpoint of the male psychic structure and development. This led psychoanalysis of the Freud era to examine the female development pathway as a variant of the male development. Even though his views can be considered as sexist, he acknowledged that he did not understand women well, hence the need for more knowledge about the psychology and biology of women. It is also important to note that Freud presented clinical descriptions that were based on his observations. However, Freud drew some conclusions from the observations in a manner that implied that the conclusions were universally valid. Currently, it is possible to draw alternative conclusions from the conclusions made by Freud, which are not influenced by similar cultural stereotypes. These conclusions take into consideration the impact of cultural factors and socialization of innate processes, which also includes a contemporary understanding of development and biology. Influenced by Freud’s psychology, even in the present day, psychoanalysis is deemed as a field that depreciates women. In present day, advancements have been made that improve the understanding of women. These advancements have also contributed to a reexamination of the old ideas. This has helped in molding psychoanalysis as a field that can support and facilitate female analysis, healing, and recovery. Early psychoanalytical formulations were based on reconstructions and inferences of child development from the clinical experiences of adults. However, most of these formulations have been replaced by concepts that are based on the observations of the actual development of a child in a patient and normal population. Over recent years, observations of young infants have contributed to major revisions in psychoanalytic and human-development theories. Modern technological and technical advances in psychoanalysis have led to the introduction of tools for the experimentation and observation of women in respect to biological sciences and related fields. Based on these advances, it is possible to repudiate Freud’s assertions and point out the inaccuracies in his fact. For instance, it is possible to reject Freud’s claims of women castration by arguing that no woman has been deprived off a penis because she never got one in the first place. Analysis of the anatomy of women also shows that there is no biological basis for arguing that women were born with a penis. It is also possible to dispute the claim that women were denied something that men enjoyed because they had a penis. Freud argued that women were denied the power to control their destiny, freedom, and autonomy. However, it is important to consider that women were not denied these aspects because of their anatomical differences to men, but because of social and cultural factors. Thus, by overcoming the inferiorities of women imposed by Freud is important in the development of psychoanalysis as a field that can support female analysis and their healing and recovery. It is also important to accept social and cultural factors that limit or facilitate female access to psychoanalysis.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    film
    Freedom Program Budget Name Institution Affiliation Freedom Program Budget Description of Unit/Department, My role, and the Current Fiscal Climate with Supporting Evidence from the Literature Berkeley College is a private college mainly found in New York and New Jersey. It offers undergraduate and graduate programs to its students in different areas and professionals. The college has several campuses three in New York while six in New Jersey as well as has effective and efficient online programs that supplements and supports the institution's mission and objectives in the academic world. The different programs offered by Berkeley College in the School of Business, school of professional studies, school of health studies, school of liberal arts as well as graduate school ensures that the educational goals of the college are met. The different schools and programs offered by the college are managed by the Central College Administration (CCA) and supported by Berkeley Educational Services (BES). The college as part of the community seeks a grant and financial support from The Drug-Free Communities (DFC) Support Program that works with communities to support initiatives that strengthen the infrastructure among local partners. And, create and sustain a reduction in local youth substance use. Berkeley College has the mandate to curb the rising cases of alcoholism and substance abuse in the institution. Also, help its students try to achieve their primary goals and objectives concerning the academic life and improve the society as a whole in addressing the challenge that is reported in all the parts of the society. The new Freedom Program is a universal health initiative that focuses on reducing issues of alcoholism and substance abuse that Berkeley College shares the same objective. Berkeley College through its College health wellness center is the Unit or department developing the budget for. My role is the director of nursing education in the wellness center in the institution. I am responsible for initiating programs and projects that support the vision and objectives of Berkeley College wellness efforts as well as that of the entire community (Nation) at large as the institution is part of society as the whole. The current fiscal climate has seen increased competition for funds where many interested stakeholders have continued to show and express interests in the limited funds available. From such organizations such as DFC and related partners that include Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) among others. The competition has resulted in additional requirements and hurdles that the organizations that initiate and offer such grants have put for applicants. They include the provision of a budget that would show how the intended grants would be utilized as well as elaborate explanation and analysis of the impacts that the budgeted programs shall have in the short and long-term for them to offer and support the proposals. The government and private agencies also have strict regulations and guidelines that they provide in the utilization of the funds that are designed to prevent any loss or misappropriation of funds through corrupt acts among others (Czerwinski, 2011). Other requirements and regulations have also required the organizations or institutions seeking grants to carter for a certain percentage of the total costs budgeted for as a pre-requisite for accessing the grants and funds. Berkeley College wellness budget, thus, has to research and analyze the preconditions and requirements from the DFC-funded coalitions as well as the general rules and regulations that guide wellness and health grants and applications. It would place it a better chance of successfully sailing through the application and acquisition process of the grant. Description of Budget Type, Model, and Decision Making Process with Rationale The budget proposed by Berkeley College wellness program has considered different approaches and strategies that it intends to use in formulation and design of the budget. It notes aspects that can be accessed and acquired internally such as in the salary and professionals that the institution health and wellness programs have such as nurses, counselors, and clinical sociologists among others. The budget has considered the hourly rates that such professionalism in the institution gets including the bonuses and, thus, such factors have played and determined the figures arrived at in the budget preparation processes. It has also considered services that would be purchased in the process of realizing the desired and set goals and targets in the alcohol and substance abuse reduction initiatives in the college community. For example, it has considered the contracted personnel to provide different services and expertise in the program, travel postage, consultancy, and printing services among others. Additionally, it has also included the non-capital that touches on the supplies, materials and media elements that would enhance communication of the messages to the different groups and targets set in the program. Planning costs also are catered for in the budget where it provides forums that more excellent details, logistics and plans and programs of the budget are implemented and formulated to enhance the chance of successful and effective utilization of the funds and execution of the different targets and goals in the project. It includes training, salary, and wages for staff members and consultants, payment of suppliers of various goods and services including media that shall enhance communication goals that include advertising and print services among others. The model used incorporates all-funds and planning where individual costs and elements in the budget have been computed and compared to the total budget of the programs. It notes the percentage share and portion that they cost that gives a quick direction and indication of the aspects that utilize the highest that includes salaries as well as the lowest that is the portion of advertising and telephone bills. The responsibility that each part of the project would play has also determined the allocation and portion offered in the budget. The decision-making process of the budget used a hybrid approach that has incorporated elements of centralized as well as decentralized approaches. It is because deferent stakeholders would play a different role in the implementation of the anticipated programs of Berkeley College wellness project. Some measures would be implemented by the leaders of the project (director of nursing education) that shall also monitor the development of other aspects and processes in the budget. On the same note, the different stakeholders involved in the implementation of the various elements of the budget also are empowered to work independently and meet given or set targets. For example, the consultants that would contribute to successful implementation of the programs to achieve goals and objectives that reduce the alcoholism and substance abuse by over 40 percent as set in the plans. The hybrid option for budgeting enables capturing of information and data that one approach cannot capture alone and, thus, the hybrid system results in a more detailed budget result and process. It includes and incorporates decisions from key stakeholders that increase the chance of successfully implementing the project by Berkeley College wellness team. Budget Expression Naturally or Functionally Presentation of a visual budget expression, either naturally or functionally, including Revenue Sources, Expenses, and Budgeted Amount with Grand Total
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    film
    John Diyangirang 4th Street, Kasarani, Nairobi, Kenya Tel: +254 (0)20 832 883 freddymuok@gmail.com Professional Summary A passionate and dedicated mental health nurse with experience in providing geriatric care to the elderly patients within a nursing home setting with proven excellence at engaging with and providing professional support to distressed patients through evidence based crisis management skills. Knowledgeable in therapeutic communication approaches with excellent care planning ability and a holistic approach to patient assessment and an active scholar with proven experience in academic content research and editing of custom essays, term papers and dissertations. Core Skills Practical skills in medication management of psychiatric patients Hands-on knowledge of geriatric nutrition management Verifiable knowledge of venipuncture, wound dressing and injection administration Professional care of diabetic patients, including the ability to check blood glucose levels Extensive research writing skills, academic content editing and peer mentoring for academic writers and editors. Ability to build and sustain therapeutic relationship with the clients
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    film
    Fred John Diyangirang Lugod Bexley Road, Eltham, London SE9 2PQ Tel: 44 (0)20 8321 8837 APPLICATION FOR THE POSITION OF ACADEMIC WRITER (NURSING) I am writing to apply for the position of a Nursing, Healthcare and Social Sciences research writer with your company. I present proven achievement and experience as an academic writer specializing in Nursing and Social Science research since 2013. With a major in Mental Health Nursing and extensive experience working in geriatric care, I have proven knowledge of nursing practice, which makes me a competent writer in Nursing, Healthcare and Social Science fields. I hold a BSc. Mental Health Nursing from the University of East London where I graduated in 2012 with an impressive class rank of 2:1 and a Diploma in Education for People with Special Needs from the University of Greenwich (2008). With a proven experience in academic writing, I am highly versatile and capable of delivering projects in fields other than my nursing specialisation. I have successfully completed hundreds of term papers, custom essays and dissertation projects, most which were graded very highly.  I have also worked as an academic content editor and reviewer, tasked mainly with ensuring proper grammatical construction of completed papers, excellent citation and referencing styles as well as originality of written content. I am well versed in standard academic referencing and citation styles, including APA, MLA, Harvard, Chicago, Oxford, and OSCOLA. I am available to undertake further tests to verify my suitability for this position at your earliest convenience. Best Regards, Fred John Diyangirang
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    film
    Framework for Policies and Procedures in the Workplace Name Institution Framework for Policies and Procedures in the Workplace Introduction The public health philosophy premised on prevention of diseases and promoting human health through multi-pronged strategies continue to significantly affect the current standards. One of the current practices that have been largely influenced by this philosophy is public health surveillance programs (Tountas, 2009). Professionals in this field use these programs as tools for early warning against impending public health emergencies. They also use these programs in documenting the impact of interventions and in tracking progress towards the realization of particular goals and objectives (Dawson, 2012). Moreover, they use these programs in monitoring and clarifying the epidemiology of health problems and in informing health policies (Ashcroft, 2016). I agree with this analysis because they reflect how current standards borrow greatly from the public health philosophy. For example, it is through the utilization of public health surveillance programs anchored on the need to prevent diseases and to promote human health that has led to quick interventions against outbreaks such as Ebola, thus reducing its effects on the population. Succession Planning Succession planning is fundamental in every institution as it helps in ensuring that there no leadership and management gaps at any given time thereby enabling it to carry on with its vision and mission uninterrupted. It is important for institutions to have succession plan for a number of reasons. They first one is it helps in the identification of the most qualified a competent managers and leaders capable of smoothly taking the roles of the departing ones (Rothwell, 2015). It also helps in avoiding the recruitment challenges and costs associated with hiring top leaders. Besides, it helps in maintaining brand identity of the organization. Moreover, it will enable the institution to create long-term map for the future with enhanced predictability (Mattone, 2013). The employees who should have a succession plan include those in the senior management level such as heads of departments, HR leaders, and chief officers such as those in charge of finance, operations, and strategy. Organizations should have a succession plan when they have knowledge that the tenure of a particular senior leader or manager is about to end. They should also have one for key roles that are in danger of being vacant in the foreseeable future (Gordon & Overbey, 2018).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    film
    Ethical Theories and Ethical Decision Making Name of Student Name of University Ethical Theories and Ethical Decision Making Part 1: Emanuel Kant’s Analysis of global issues surrounding Ethics and Ethical Decision Making Ethical theories have been instrumental in informing people and organizations on the approaches of determining an ethical conduct or decision. Immanuel Kant is one of the foremost philosophers that contributed significantly to the development of the ethical theories. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher whose works on ethics and morality focused on the global issues surrounding ethics and ethical decisions. Kant’s ethical perspectives emerged during the enlightenment rationalism era, providing the moral and ethical foundations for what constituted a good idea or action. The enlightenment rationale held that an action is good if it emanates from the duty to observe the moral good. Accordingly, Kant developed his Kantian ethical theory from the traditional enlightenment principle. In Kantian moral ethics, global actions, or decisions must be viewed from the viewpoint of established moral norms or the intended greater good of the global community. The Kantian ethical theory developed by Immanuel Kant holds that an ethical action or decision on whether it meets our duty rather than the consequences (Timmons, 2012). This aspect means that an action or decision is determined to be right or wrong is depends on whether it is acceptable in the beginning but not on the consequences it generates once performed. Consequently, an action or decision can be immoral regardless of the positive consequences it generates if it is against the moral laws of the society according to Immanuel Kant’s moral philosophy. For instance, environmental conservation is a universally sanctioned moral norm. When a company’s actions degrade the environment while at the same creating employment for a given population, the company’s operations are unethical and immoral despite the positive consequences of job creation under Kantian ethics. Part 2: Aristotle’s Contribution to Personal Ethics and Moral Development Personal ethics and moral development continues to attract contributions from renowned philosophers. One of the philosophers who studied and contributed immensely to personal ethics and moral development is Aristotle. Aristotle (384-322 BC) was a renowned Greek philosopher and scientist who developed the Nicomachean ethics, an extended or elaborated version of Plato’s works on ethics and moral development. The Nicomachean ethics by Aristotle observes that there is not a specific form by virtue dictating that all good things are good. According to Aristotle, human beings are rational animals that work towards a predictable end (Aristotle, Bartlett, & Collins, 2012). This argument means that humans work to realize the optimal potential. From this argument, it follows that human actions or decisions are irrational if one or a society fails to realize its optimal potential. The approach employed by Aristotle implies that the end of the action or decision determines its ethical fitness. The ethical and moral compass advanced by Aristotle requires humans to undertake retrospective reflections on their intended actions and proceed only with those actions that yield ethical and moral outcomes. Part 3 Comparison of Aristotle and Kantian Theories The theories advanced by Kant and Aristotle comparatively differ in the determination of an ethical action or decision. The Kantian theory argues that duty to fulfill the moral law determines if the action or decision is good or wrong irrespective of the results it yields. In contrast, Aristotle advances the argument that the result of the action or decision in promoting the happiness of the individual or society determines if it is right or wrong irrespective of the moral obligations held by the society or individual. While Kant proposes ethical conduct based on the rightness or wrongness of the actor’s intentions, Aristotle’s ethical and moral theory focuses on the outcome of an action rather than the action itself of the intention. Part 4: Relevance of the Ethical Theories to Healthcare Profession The ethical theories are essential in the health care profession due to the role they play in guiding the healthcare professionals on the conducts they should observe in performing their duties to ensure that they do not violate the dignity and life of the patients. Employing the ethical theories in resolving a healthcare concerns ensure that the professionals can determine a justifiable decision to employ in every patient scenario (Morrison & Furlong, 2018). Additionally, the elements of character, personal and professional values, integrity, and code of conduct are important qualities for the health care professionals. Personal character means the traits possessed by an individual when carrying their duties (Morrison & Furlong, 2018). Character is essential in healthcare practice because it influences the professionals’ responsiveness to an emergency and interaction with a volatile patient or family members, which are critical in determining the quality of service delivery and saving life. Personal and professional values denote the behaviors reflecting personal or professional needs, care, and desires in one’s conducts. Accordingly, personal and professional values are crucial qualities for the health care professionals since they shape their interests and commitments in offering the sensitive care services to the patients. Similarly, the element of integrity, which defines an individual’s ability to uphold honesty and high moral principles, is an important quality for the health care professionals since it determines their ability to stick to the right and optimal care delivery guidelines when caring for the patient (Morrison & Furlong, 2018). Lastly, the code of conduct is important for the healthcare professionals because it ensures that the staff members are sensitized on their obligations and consequences of failing to observe their obligations, which deters negative actions.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE

Tertiary education Topics

Other Tertiary education Essays

  • Tertiary education
    Genetically modified organisms (GMO)
    GMO How are genetically modified organisms different from non-genetically modified organism? Genetically modified organisms are animals, plants and other organisms whose genetic composition was altered using genetic recombination and modification techniques performed in a laboratory. On the other hand, non-GMO organisms are those organisms that are produced naturally and were not modified (the organic & non organic report 2017; rumiano cheese 2011 & non-gmoproject 2016). The recent acts of activist intent on destruction of research plots included plants altered by molecular as well as classical genetic techniques. Is it possible to distinguish between plants altered by classical genetics and those altered by modern techniques? If it’s possible, how is it done?  It is possible and it can be distinguished by checking the DNA of the organism. Thion et al. 2002 conducted an experiment on how to extract/purify DNA of soybeans to check if the sample was transgenic and had undergone extraction and purification. The checking can be done through the use of a microscopic technology. Meanwhile, Schreiber (2013) adds that the detection could be done through a biochemical means where the present GMO will be measured. In isolating and amplifying a piece of DNA, the technique using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used to make millions of copies of the strands of the DNA. It is easier to see visually the altered and non-altered DNA if there are millions of copies of the DNA. What safeguards are in place to protect Americans from unsafe food? Are these methods science-based? Mention at least 2 methods. The US government safeguards the Americans from unsafe foods through the FDA or US Food and Drug Administration. Their methods are science-based, i.e. its whole genome sequencing technology and its measures in controlling microbial hazards. The whole genome sequencing technology is used by the FDA in identifying pathogens isolated from food. The FDA also safeguards foods by controlling microbial hazards through the process of elimination of growth and reduction of growth. The elimination methods are either through heating or freezing while the reduction of growth method involves the use of acidity, temperature and water activity. (Bradsher et al. 2015, pp. 85 – 86; FDA 2007; FDA 2013). Name at least 10 examples of harm to citizens from unsafe food. What percentage of these illnesses was caused by genetically modified organisms? If so, mention any example Some examples of harm to people from unsafe foods are harmful diseases extending from diarrhea to cancer caused by eating foods contaminated with viruses, bacteria, chemical substances and parasites. Around 600 million people around the world fell ill after consumption of contaminated food; diarrheal diseases cause around 125,000 death of children 0-5 years of age (WHO 2015). Based on the studies made by IRT (2011), foods from genetically modified organisms cause damage to the immune system, gastrointestinal and other organs, infertility and accelerated aging. These happen because residue or bits of materials of the GMO food can be left inside the person’s body, which eventually can cause long-term problems. Statistics show that in 9 years after the introduction of GMOs in the market, Americans who had chronic illnesses rose from 7 to 13% and other diseases such as digestive problems, autism, and reproductive disorders are rising (IRT 2011).
    $ 0.13
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    ‘Globalisation is good’ or ‘is it not?’
    ‘Globalisation is good’ or ‘is it not?’ Globalisation is good because it opens doors of opportunities to many. It was the reason for the broad and speedy worldwide interconnectedness of the current social life – from cultural to criminal and from financial to spiritual. This is synonymous to having a borderless world but critics argue stating that globalisation has in fact disconnected the world from its national geographical divisions – the countries (Yoong & Huff 2007). Although some are discounting the benefits of globalisation to the world, I still consider globalisation to be the driving force in the global partnerships between companies that created more opportunities and jobs. The world trade may have plunged, the dollar dwindled, commodities slumped, but overall, globalisation has brought good to the peoples of the world. Globalisation through the internet has unlocked the doors to the sharing of cultures, knowledge, goods and services between peoples of all countries and the modern technologies lifted the barriers for accommodating a speedy transfer. The case of Inditex in marketing their Zara brand globally manifests that in business, one formula does not fit all. Every country has its own culture and styles and a business that is going global must do their homework well before entering the new market. Inditex’s Zara brand was a success to the Europeans but struggles in America and still trying their luck with the Chinese. But despite of these differences, the company is still considering going global because they needed new markets and they knew they will be opening bigger opportunities and jobs to more people (La Coruna 2012). Moreover, globalisation has also done well to the manufacturing sector. Statistics show that the global industrial output in 2010 registered fifty-seven times more than the production in the 1900. Also, globalisation has changed the way things are produced. The manufacturers going global take advantage of the skills and the costs of producing products in different countries. This means that the design of the product may be done in the US, manufactured in China or Taiwan then assembled in the Philippines. So every item – be it an iPad, a doll or a washing machine is collaboratively produced by the best skilled workers in the world at the lowest labor cost (The economist 2012). Consequently, since the product was a collaboration of different countries so it can be also marketed and patronized in those countries (The economist 2012). However, there are some who are openly argues that it failed to deliver the many publicized benefits to the poor. A Filipino economist, Walden Bello, coins a new term to describe the present global economic situation as caused by “deglobalisation” due to the downturn of the economies of big countries such as Singapore, Taiwan, Germany, Japan and Brazil. However, the poor countries are the ones that show faster growth than the rich countries, making globalisation still good because of the opportunities it gives to the needy. On the other hand, Dunning, et al (2007) claims that the current inclinations in the global economy reflect a more distributed rather than a geographical sharing of multi-national enterprise activity and foreign direct investments and to the carrying-out of transactions that are globally oriented. Contrary to the common beliefs, globalisation is not a new thing in the global business world. According to McMahon (2004) it existed since the late parts of the fifteenth century when a society of nations consisting of the countries in Northern Europe entered the rest of the world through exploration, trade and then conquest. This process which involves the exploitation of wealth and power by the European voyagers lead to industrialization in Britain, then mass international industrialization and eventually globalisation (McMahon 2004). Sheel (2005) adds that the interchange of technology and markets between countries have been among the first human innovations since the most primitive times. Globalisation was termed that time as “exchange” where the country’s surpluses were exchanged with other surpluses of peoples from other countries. This old system of exchange was developed, continued to grow and increased to greater heights in the modern times (Waters 2001 as cited in van Krieken, et al 2006). Robertson (2003) asserts that globalisation is inherent in people, motivated by their desire for self-interest and cooperation for survival. The author theorizes that globalisation existed due to the encouragement of interconnectedness by the social, political, economic and technological growths performing as catalysts for both local and global developments (Robertson 2003). Robertson (2003) claims that globalisation has emerged in three waves – during the 1500 to 1800 for the first wave, 18th century up to the 20th century for the second wave and the third wave is after the World War 2. However, Sheel (2008) categorizes globalisation in four phases – the 1st phase took place on the 16th century, the 2nd phase on the late 18th century, the 3rd phase during the 19th to 20th century and the fourth phase is during the end of the 20th century. According to the analysis of Robertson (2003), the first wave (1500 to 1800) saw the upsurge of colonization, invasion, imperialism, misery of the indigenous people, migration and changes in politics, economy and culture. The first wave has encouraged the creation of interconnectedness between peoples, countries and cultures, as instigated by commerce and trade. The second phase (18th to 20th century) was characterized by the start of Industrial Revolution, paving the way for industrialization and increase of income and profits especially to those who had technological skills. The trade routes created during the first wave were utilized by the manufacturers in sourcing their raw materials from other countries. However, by the end of the second wave, civil conflicts in many countries arose, same with the unfortunate events of World Wars 1 and 2 and the Great Depression. The third phase of globalisation transpired after World War 2. This was the phase when European economies were down whilst USA was enjoying a flourishing economy with tough industrial foundation and strong military. The latter part of the third phase (during the middle of the 20th century), the growth of globalisation was challenged by the emergence of communist ideology and the military force of Soviet Union. This challenge resulted to cold war between USA and Soviet Union where Soviet Union collapsed in 1989 (Robertson 2003). In addition to Robertson’s analysis, Sheel (2005) adds that there exists a fourth phase of globalisation that happened during the end of the 20th century where countries the developing and developed countries merged as partners in cross border trade and investments, stimulating the convergence of India and China. However, issues about globalisation’s worthiness have surfaced, some critics consisting of anti-globalisation groups argue that globalisation in corporate organisations have increased povery and inequality (Engler 2007). A study was made by World Value Survey regarding globalisation and 57% of the survey respondents consider globalisation as good. Most of the approving respondents were optimistic that globalisation would encourage the improvement of the workers’ working conditions, economic equality, global peace, global stability and human rights (Leiserowitz, et al 2006). But still, anti-globalisation groups insist that poverty, homelessness and environmental destruction will be highlighted if globalisation continues as it only centers on increasing trade and investment but ignores environmental protections and human rights (Engler 2007). But Edwards & Usher (2008) comment that the argument of the anti-globalisation groups are only superficial because despite their protests against globalisation they still engage in globalisation practices such the use of computers, internets and mobiles in their dissemination of their opposition. This manifests that these protesters are only selective in their opposition. They are not against the good effects of globalisation in communication but only on the aspect of capitalism. The inequality of wealth and poverty is one of the issues that plagued globalisation where critics claim that it makes the poor countries poorer and the rich countries richer as they exploit and amass the wealth of the minority country. But Holmes, et al (2007) reason that there is really a big difference on the distribution of benefits as the developed country provides the money or the capital whilst the developing country (minority) offers its resources and labor. This set-up ends-up with the developed country that provided the financial capitalization getting the bigger share of the profit. However, one aspect of globalisation that really brought good benefits to the people is the technological globalisation. Dahlman (2007) describes technological globalisation as the development of knowledge and skills through research by capable engineers and scientists and offering them to countries that have no inventive capability. The acquisition of these inventions by other countries enables them of acquiring technological transfer. Technologies can be transferred through technical assistance, direct foreign investment, importation of goods and components of products, licensing, copying and reverse engineering (Dahlman 2007). The advancement of communication technology through networking has opened more opportunities and economic growth. In addition, the video of Johan Norberg entitled “Globalisation is good – the case of Taiwan” illustrates the importance of globalisation in uplifting the poor conditions of poor countries. The video presented two former poor countries – Taiwan and Kenya – and compare and contrast what have they become 50 years after. Taiwan became 20 times progressive than Kenya whilst Kenya remained a poor country. Norberg explains that the reason for this difference is the globalisation that Taiwan embraced 50 years ago. Taiwan allowed capitalists to invest in their country whilst they provide the resources and labor. Moreover, Taiwan allowed the integration of their economy to the global trade whilst Kenya continued to shun globalisation. The video also presented the value of the multinational companies like Nike that employs the labor force of Vietnam in their sweatshop. Instead of being exploited, the Vietnamese were given good working conditions, high salaries and more benefits. Contrary of the claim of anti-globalisation groups that multinational investors will only exploit local workers, Vietnamese workers were given the opportunity to rise from their poverty through the works provided for them by globalisation. Conclusion: Contrary to what most people believe, globalisation has been in existence since time immemorial through surplus “exchange” and though the people were not yet privy to the term, they were already using the method of globalisation in their interconnection with other people’s business and lives. Now that the term globalisation is out in the open, people all around the world become mindful of each other’s affairs and consequences, disapproving how the system of globalisation makes the rich countries richer and the poor countries poorer. But as Norberg (2012) has seen it, globalisation is good as it intends to improve productivity and working condition. Though critics argue that it only exploits and amass the wealth of the poor country, Norberg was right when he said that if it is exploitation, then the world’s problem is by not exploiting the poor properly. The case of Taiwan and Kenya is already an eye-opener to those who still shut the door to globalisation. There may be ups and downs in the world of business but it cannot be blamed everything to globalisation because globalisation is only a method of interaction and not the one that is making the business or the deal. Globalisation through the internet has opened the doors to the sharing of cultures, knowledge, goods and services between peoples of all countries and the modern technologies lifted the barriers for accommodating a speedy transfer. The case of Inditex in marketing their Zara brand globally manifests that in business, one formula does not fit all. Every country has its own culture and styles and a business that is going global must be well prepared before entering the new market. Inditex’s Zara brand was a success to the Europeans but struggles in America and still trying their luck with the Chinese. But despite of these differences, the company is still considering going global because they needed new markets and they knew they will be opening bigger opportunities and jobs to more people. This proves that globalization brings good to many but one must know how to diversify and take advantage of the various benefits of globalization to reach greater success in the future.
    $ 0.13
    12,670words / 1page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Explicit Teaching
    Explicit Teaching Introduction Not all students are equal. Some are fast learners; others need assistance while others are unruly – not because they are doing it intentionally, but because they are suffering from learning disabilities causing hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. Some adjustments are needed in the learning environment and these adjustments should be tailored based on the individual learning needs of the students. Explicit teaching provides active communication and interaction between the student and the teacher and it involves direct explanation, modeling and guided practice (Rupley & Blair 2009). This paper will demonstrate Explicit Teaching applied to a class scenario with students suffering from a learning disability known as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity. Furthermore, a lesson will be developed featuring an example of an explicit teaching approach showing how to differentiate the lesson to meet the needs of every student, with or without learning disability before finally concluding. 2A: ET Creating a Scenario One of the learning disabilities encountered is AD/HD or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, a neurological disorder that is likely instigated by biological factors that impact chemical messages (neurotransmitters) in some specific parts of the brain. In this type of learning disability, the parts of the brain that control reflective thought and the restriction of ill-considered behavior are affected by the slight imbalances in the neurotransmitters (ADCET 2014). AD/HD is characterized by hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. Students with ADHD are those who never seem to listen, cannot sit still, do not follow instruction no matter how clear the instructions are presented to them, or those who just interrupt others and blurt-out improper comments at improper times. Moreover, these students are oftentimes branded as undisciplined, troublemakers or lazy (NHS 2008). In managing students with AD/HD, some adjustments in the learning environment are needed and these adjustments should be tailored based on the individual needs of the student. It should be noted that persons with AD/HD have different manifestations and the nature of disability as well as its effect on the student’s learning also vary (ADCET 2014). Direct instruction is considered as one of the best approaches in teaching students with AD/HD, but it must be used skilfully and the teacher should think of strategies to prevent it from becoming boring. Killen (2003) states that in using direct instruction, the teacher should emphasise teaching in small steps so the student will be able to practice every step and their practice will be guided to come-up with high level of success. In teaching a student with AD/HD, creative presentation of course material is advisable and this could be done through the use of visual aids and hands-on experience to stimulate the student’s senses. The teacher may use personal stories such as the student’s ideas and experiences (Killen (2003). It will also help if the teacher encourages the student with AD/HD to sit in front or near in front of the classroom to limit distractions (Tait 2010). Telling the student of what the teacher wants him to learn or be able to do – such as reading, writing, etc. - will help in the student’s better understanding of the lesson. In presenting the lesson, the teacher should present the lesson at a pace that the student can handle, such as not too slow or too fast. Important points should be emphasised so the student will realise its significance. To check if the student understands the lesson, the teacher may ask questions and if the student cannot answer, the teacher should re-explain everything that the student gets confused with. New words or new terms should be explained through examples. Assigning colors to different objects is a good visual aid in processing visual information. To help the student with AD/HD process written material, the teacher may use various verbal descriptions as possible. A list of acronyms and terms will also help, as well as a variety of teaching formats like films, flow charts or handouts. At the end of the lesson, a summary should be given, stressing the important points of the lesson. 2B: ET Lesson PlanKey Learning Area: Math Stage: 7 Year level: Year 7 Unit/Topic: Algebra Learner Outcomes: This lesson focuses in essential algebraic topics intended to prepare students for the study of Algebra and its applications. Students are introduced to topics involving mathematical operations with whole numbers, decimals and integers. Upon completion of this lesson, students are expected to answer and use mathematical language to show understanding; use reasoning to identify mathematical relationships; and continue and be familiar with repeating patterns. Indicators: At the end of the lesson, students are able to recognise what comes next in repeating patterns, identify patterns used in familiar activities, recognise an error in a pattern, able to simplify algebraic fractions, factorise quadratic expressions and operate with algebraic expressions. Resources: Whiteboard, colored visual aids, workbooks and class notes where the procedures are listed. Prior Knowledge: Students possess basic math knowledge (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). They also have basic understanding of the terms such as whole numbers, positive, negative, decimals and integers. Assessment Strategies: To assess the students’ learning, students will be asked to do mathematical operations. Their answers will be checked, marked and recorded; and those who are unable to answer correctly will be asked what is it that they are getting confused. For students with learning disability, their computations will be checked and evaluated. Comments will be recorded in a record book regarding the student’s performance.
    $ 0.13
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Ethical Promotion Paper (Nursing)
    Ethical Promotion Paper In today’s globalization, the use of electronic health record significantly helps in sharing patient’s information to other healthcare providers across health organizations for patient’s better access to health care, decrease of costs and improvement of the quality of care (Ozair et al. 2015). However, the increasing use of electronic health record of patients over paper records sometimes generates ethical issues that should be given attention. Nurses are bound to follow the Code of Ethics and sharing of patient information, even digitally, should be done within the right conduct. This paper will discuss the article written by Ozair, Jamshed, Sharma & Aggrawal (2015) entitled, “Ethical issues in electronic health records: a general overview”, which was published in Perspectives in Clinical Research. My thoughts on the role that health care professionals should play in resolving the said ethical issue will also be discussed, as well as the specific theory that will support my position. Article’s Summary Ozair et al. (2015) aimed to explore the ethical issues created in the use of electronic health record (EHR), as well as to discuss its possible solutions. Although the use of digital health record could improve the patient’s quality of healthcare and decrease cost, transferring or sharing information through digital technology poses hazards that could lead to security breaches and endanger safety of information. When the patient’s information or health data are shared to others without the patient’s consent, then their autonomy is put at risk. Electronic health record contains the patient’s health data including his/her medical diagnoses, history, immunization dates, treatment plans and laboratory results. Every person has the right to privacy and confidentiality and his information can only be shared if he permits it or dictated by law. If the information was shared because of clinical interaction, then that information should be treated as confidential and be protected. The confidentiality of information can be protected by allowing only the authorized personnel to have access. Thus, the users are identified and assigned with passwords and usernames. However, these may not be enough to protect the confidentiality of the patient’s information and stronger policies on security and privacy are needed to secure the information. According to a survey, around 73% of doctors communicate with other doctors through text about work and when mobile devices get lost or stolen, the confidentiality of the information about patients are put at stake. Hence, security measures such as intrusion detection software, antivirus software and firewalls should be used to protect the integrity of data and maintain patient’s confidentiality and privacy. When patient data is transferred, there is a possibility of the data getting lost or destructed especially when errors are made during the “cut and paste” process. The integrity of data may also be compromised when the physician uses drop down menu and his/her choices become limited due to the choices available in the menu, causing him/her to select the wrong choice, thus, leading to huge errors. However, the authors claim that these ethical issues can be resolved through the creation of an effective EHR system, involving clinicians, educators, information technologies and consultants in the development and implementation of the ERH system. My Thoughts on the role of health care professionals The role of health care professionals is vital in ensuring that the right of patients to privacy and confidentiality are observed even in the use of electronic health record (EHR). Patient’s human rights in care include their rights to confidentiality and privacy (Cohen & Ezer 2013). To ensure that there will be no ethical issues created in the use of EHR, health care professionals should be properly informed about the importance of the system, as well as the ethical issues that could arise if the rights of the patient are not properly observed. Hence, it is vital that the knowledge of the health care professionals regarding the right implementation of EHR starts from their education curriculum, as well as in their continuous training and nurses’ participation in the workflow of EHR (Koolaee, Safdan & Bouraghi 2015). Computer literacy is a must for health care professionals to ensure that the sharing of health data information are not lost or destructed during the process and medical errors are not committed. Conclusion The use of electronic health record improves and increases efficiency in patient care, as well as patients’ access to care across health organizations. However, health care professionals should never ignore the rights of patients to their privacy and confidentiality so they should be properly informed if ever there is a need for their health data information to be shared to others to avoid ethical issues. List of References Cohen J. & Ezer T. (2013). ‘Human rights in patient care: a theoretical and practical
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE