Result of "MUSIC"

Total 23 Search Results Are Shown Below.

  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: ISO 14000 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ISO 14000 Environmental Management Insert name Institution Date ISO 14000 and National Legislative and Regulatory Agencies ISO 14000 is a series of standards and procedure reference documents handling issues such as Environment Management Systems, environment auditing, Eco labeling, life cycle evaluation, environmental characteristics in product Standards and environmental performance assessment. National legislative and regulatory agencies among other objectives also endeavor to control the effects of production activities to the environment to prevent the pollution of the environment by firms (Kuhre, 2005). ISO 14000 standards are established through the guidelines of the already existing environmental laws. These laws and regulations have been established and are enforced by various national legislative and regulatory agencies which are responsible for the protection of the environment. Rules and regulations which have been established by national legislative and regulatory agencies aim at maintaining a constant environmental performance which is also the main objective of the ISO 14000 family (Kuhre, 2005). The main intention of ISO 14001:2004 is to ensure that firms conform to consistent environmental performance procedures. In a similar way where firms are required to adhere to established rules and regulations, in some cases, they are required to conform to ISO 14000 for them to be allowed to trade in various markets. ISO 14000 and regulatory agencies also work together as evidenced by the ISO 14000 multistate function group which consists of more than ten state regulating bodies involved in assessing the benefits of EMS (Kuhre, 2005). The group aims at establishing a consistent and uniform approach for state bodies to incorporate ISO 14001 into state programs. Another integration of ISO 14000 and federal agencies is also shown by the Federal Inter-agency functional group which encompasses fifteen federal groups or agencies. These agencies have a common objective of establishing a uniform procedure and approach to all ISO 14000 guidelines in all state and federal agencies (Kuhre, 2005). ISO 14000
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: CYBER THREATS Cyber Threats: Insert name: Institution: Date: Estonia 2007: Targeting a Nation-State Cyber security was not an imperative issue in many government policies around the world, until the devastating April-May 2007 cyber attacks on Estonia. The IT-dependent country was faced with distributed denial-of-service attacks (DDOS) whose impact is still apparent around the world (Gears, 2007). This paper focuses on the attacks on Estonia; the motivation of the attackers, the attack methods that were used, and the response of the Estonian government. Also provided in the paper is the role of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure (http://cve.mitre.org) in preventing cyber threats. The Estonian government’s attacks were politically motivated, after the Estonian government decided to relocate a monument belonging to the Soviets to a military cemetery. The Russian authorities and the ethnic Russian community in Estonia severely criticized this decision, which led to two nights of looting and rioting in Tallinn (Aykin, 2009). In the ensuing cyber attacks that targeted Estonia, it appears that a combination of various attack methods was utilized. One of these methods was the persistent transmission of extraneous information that was meant to tie up the servers. This method flooded the computing resources of the Estonian Government, and ensured that genuine requests for information in various departments, including the department of Defense, remained unanswered. The attackers also used these cyber attacks to block the transmission of routing information, a move that prevented genuine requests from reaching their destination (Richards, 2009). Another method implemented was the use of malware, or malicious software. The malware programs destroyed the system software and hardware, and in some cases, the programs managed to turn other computer systems into zombie systems. This made future attacks in the subsequent weeks easy to execute as the zombie systems were later used as launch pads for future attacks. By using web logs and Russian-language chat rooms, the hackers were able to coordinate the cyber attacks. In addition, many of the attackers utilized globally distributed botnets. In the aftermath of the attack, it was discovered that the zombie computers seized in the attacks on Estonia alone resided in more than fifty countries. The U.S. was one of these countries (Richards, 2009). The attacks continued for an agonizing three weeks, until it was revealed that a large number of the attacking zombie systems were coming from outside Estonia. The government immediately took steps to shut off all international web traffic and blocked all inward bound international traffic. This elicited expressions of grief from the news media, who mourned the irony of the government’s decision, since they could not report to the rest of the world what was happening in their country (Harrington, 2008). The issue of cyber threats becomes bigger every day, as the world becomes more interconnected. This calls for proactive approaches, better information sharing and effective policies by governments, to deter and stop potential cyber attacks. An effective approach would be to ensure that websites, databases and such related security products are CVE-compatible, as a precautionary measure against threats. Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), a list of information security vulnerabilities and exposures whose aim is making it easier to share data across vulnerability capabilities of various divides may be seen as a potential aid to hackers. However, the advantages of CVE outweigh the risks involved, because, firstly, sharing information is much more complicated within the information security community than it is for hackers. Secondly, the process of an organization protecting its networks is far more tasking than that of a hacker exploiting a single vulnerability. Moreover, CVE is restricted to widely known vulnerabilities (CVE, 2009).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: EQUAL BENEFITS FOR SAME SEX COUPLES Equal Benefits for Same Sex Couples Insert Name Institution Date: Introduction While same-sex marriage violated religious teachings and is immoral, homosexual couples should be given the same benefits, rights and privileges as heterosexual married couples. People are not the same as we have different tastes and preferences which have to be respected by all irrespective of the stand that we take on issues. It is thus important that homosexual couples be accorded equal benefits and privileges as heterosexual couples since they are human beings with similar needs and wants as the rest of the population in addition to the fact their number is increasing with time.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running Head: ETHIC TRAINING NEEDED Ethic training needed Insert name Institution Date Ethic Training Needed For CPA License Introduction CPAs in almost every state in U.S are required to finish continuing education so that they can retain their licenses, with the normal requirements remaining to be 40- credits per hour. At the present only about 10 states direct continuing in ethics as well as professional responsibility which basically take two hours per year (John, 2008). Acquiring the CPA license requires training on ethics which usually vary in different states in U.S. Violation of these ethics can lead to penalizing action which sometimes involves revocation of the licenses (Williams, 2006). Ethic training
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Insert Name: Tutor: Course: Date Steve Wynn Stephen Alan Wynn is an American discotheque resort developer who was born in New Haven, Connecticut and was responsible for spearheading the spectacular resurgence and development of the Las Vegas strip in the 1990s. His firms have established or refurbished some of the most broadly recognized resorts in Las Vegas. Some of the resorts his firms have established or built include Encore, Golden Nugget, Treasure Island, Wynn, Bellagio and The Mirage. He is the founder and CEO of Wynn Resorts, Limited (Palmeri 1). Early life Steve was raised in Utica, New York and graduated in The Manlius School in 1959 before proceeding to University of Pennsylvania where he studied cultural anthropology and English literature. Wynn’s father had changed his name from Michael Weinberg to Michael Wynn primarily as a marketing strategy and a plan to trump anti-Semitism. He however passed on in 1963 and left behind gaming debts amounting to $35000, before Wynn completed his studies at Pennsylvania (Rosenthal 1). Steve Wynn then took over the management of the family’s bingo business in Maryland. He succeeded in business and accumulated enough funds to purchase a small venture in the Frontier Hotel and casino in Las Vegas where he relocated together with his wife. Wynn also owned a wine and liquor importing firm between the years 1968 and 1972. He was able to parlay his profits from a land deal in 1971 into a huge interest in the pointer downtown casino, the Golden Nugget Las Vegas. He expanded, renovated and refurbished the Golden Nugget which he owned to a resort hotel and casino from a gambling hall (Palmeri 1). Career as an hotelier Steve Wynn has been an hotelier and a real-estate developer for the last 42 years since his first job at the Frontier Hotel through the refurbishment of Golden Nugget. He has moved from first class to his current first-class status due to his assets which include the Wynn Macau, Wynn Las Vegas and the Encore. He has exhibited a strong spirit of leadership, boldness and entrepreneurship which has resulted not only to his enormous success but also grounds for admiration. By changing the design, style and service of the city, Wynn assisted in transforming Las Vegas into one of the most world’s preferred touring destinations. It did not come as a surprise that the Time Magazine quoted Wynn among the 100 Most Influential people (Ireland 45). Accomplishments and contributions Wynn arrived in Las Vegas and started his career as a wine and spirit hawker until he took hold of a property-in-need located in downtown Las Vegas, with the name Golden Nugget. He made an investment by purchasing a piece of land near one of the most well-known hotels on the hotel which he later sold at a reasonable profit margin. A well known banker in Las Vegas who also assisted in financing Wynn projects became his major mentor and was greatly involved in many of his transaction over the next two decades. Wynn took control of Golden Nugget and transformed it to a premier property before he got interested in the emerging market of Atlantic City. He established the Atlantic City Golden Nugget and set the current standards of present gamers and future entrepreneurs in Atlantic City (Ireland 45). Conclusion The international Society of Hospitality, which is the leading hospitality consultant, honored Steve Wynn with the 2003 ISHC pioneer Award for his contributions, improvements and achievements to the hospitality industry. Wynn has made huge contributions to the lodging and gaming industries and has been credited for transforming Las Vegas into a tourist destination point (Ireland 46).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR TEENAGERS Educational TV Programming for Teenagers Insert Name: Institution Date:
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: IDENTIFICATION OF STUDENTS WITH LD Identification of Students with LD Insert Name: Institution Date:
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY: CARL JUNG Analytical Psychology: Carl Jung Insert Name Institution Date: What is the basic direction/purpose/goal of life? The main goal in life is the attainment of the self which is the sum of all of the opposing forces in one’s life. These forces, called archetypes, together with the unconscious, and the collective unconscious build up the psyche which is the self. The process of discovering the self is known as individuation which results in the equal expression of all of your personality (Adler, 1948). A balance is created within the opposing archetypes that are embodied within the female and male archetypes.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running Head: ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT Environment management Insert name Institution Date Audits An audit is the comparison of real situation with the expected situation and an establishment of whether either of them is in conformance or not in conformance. The firm’s audit program for the ISO 14000 Environment management should possess procedures that cover several areas of concern. These areas include: audit scope, audit objectives, audit frequency, audit methodology, audit responsibilities and audit requirements. Audit scope usually outlines the part of the firm that would be audited. If the EMS audit has been split into smaller portions, the scope of any given portion of the firm is what will be audited at a particular time. The scope of the audit should however coincide with the EMS scope. An example of this is where the department of maintenance would be audited at the beginning of the year while the production is audited at the end of the year. In normal circumstances firms usually create a matrix which contains the various segments of the site or activities and the dates in which the auditing will be carried out (Baysinger, 2007). The audit objective describes the reasons as to why the audit is being conducted. This should be indicated in the audit plan since each audit has a purpose. Possible objectives of the audit could be to check conformity with ISO 14001 requirements. It could also be intended to be used to assess the audits conformity with others. The audit frequency seeks to outline the time frame between one audit and the other within the same scope. Audit methodologies attempt to describe the means in which the auditing process will take place. Different audits have different methodologies or means in which they are carried out and are therefore necessary to state or describe the particular means of carrying out a specific audit. Audit responsibilities set to describe the role to be played by each participant in the audit process. This area of the audit program describes the duties of each player in the audit process. The final area of the audit program is the audit requirements for conducting and reporting the findings. This is the manner in which the results from the audit will be given to the appropriate persons, mainly the client (Baysinger, 2007). Types of audits
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: RESEARCH PAPER PROPOSAL Research on Counseling for Alcohol Consumption and Low Self- Esteem Insert Name: Institution Date:
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: MEDICAL MALPRACTICE Medical malpractice Insert Name Institution Date: Medical Malpractice
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Name: Tutor: Course: Date: The Colosseum The first century is an era that shaped the culture of the world in a way that had never been experienced before, or since. The extinction of lions in Western Europe, the Great Fire of Rome, the painting of Alexander the Great, the beginning of the Christian church, are just a few of the numerous great events that occurred in the Classical era. It is also the era that saw the construction of indeed the greatest engineering wonders of the time, the Roman Coliseum, commonly referred to as the Colosseum. Formerly known as the Flavian Amphitheatre, the Colosseum is an oval-shaped amphitheatre located in Rome, Italy. The amphitheatre was the largest building of the era, capable of seating 50,000 spectators. Emperor Vaspasian, famed for founding the Flavian Dynasty begun the construction of the huge amphitheatre in 70-72 AD, and was inaugurated by his son Titus after Vaspasian’s death in 80 AD, and completed by Domitian (Hopkins and Beard, 63-72). Reaching a height of more than 159 feet, the Colloseum is proof of the grandeur as well as the cruelty of the Roman Empire. Many of the questions faced today concerning the Roman culture and indeed the history of the world, considering the increased domination of the Roman Empire, are raised by the Colosseum, making it the defining symbol of ancient Rome. One major characteristic of the Colosseum was its role in Roman history and politics. This huge arena symbolized the pleasures of popular entertainment, as well as a particular style of interaction between the Roman emperor and the Roman people. The dynastic change during its foundation, just after the eighteen months of civil war, is a significant event that was proof of the culture of the medieval era. Considered to be a fruit of Roman victory over the Jews, the Roman Colosseum was listed as a major site sacred to the martyrs. Found in several points of the Colosseum are crosses, which symbolize the Christian connection to the site. As a commemoration of the sacrifices and martyrdom that were carried out in the place, the Pope leads a procession to the amphitheatre every Good Friday (168-180). Works cited: Hopkins, Keith and Beard Mary. The Colosseum‎ Harvard: Harvard University Press, 2005.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Name: Tutor: Course: Date: Foie gras When the city of Chicago banned the production and selling of foie gras and its products in August 2006, the move ignited a debate that has been spreading ever since. Foie gras has been acclaimed in various foodie food circles, and is considered a cherished delicacy. If most people were aware of the production of this delicacy, they would lead rights-activists and protestors in its ban. Foie gras (pronounced ‘fwah grah’) is a French term for “fatty liver”, which can be characteristic of burgers and desserts, when seared, foamed as well as in ice cream. This is a foodstuff that is prepared from geese or ducks that are specially fattened, using an extremely inhumane and cruel system of feeding. I recently read from an article that geese and ducks that are just a few months old are confined in small pens or tiny cages, locking the birds in place. The pens are small enough to ensure that the birds cannot escape the person feeding them, known as “the feeder”, and the feeding machine. The feeder then picks a bird at a time and plunges the metallic pipe of the feeding machine down the bird’s throat. In just a few seconds, the machine pumps a large amount of a mixture of corn and oil into the gullet. It is approximated that each day, the machine pumps a mixture equivalent to one-fourth to one-third of the bird’s own weight. The suffering that the birds undergo is immense, since their physical condition rapidly gets worse, during and after the force-feeding procedure. The livers expand, pushing other organs and causing respiratory stress as a result of decreased air sac space. At this point the birds can barely breathe, let alone stand or walk. Ducks in farms can be observed panting and struggling to stand, and since their crippled legs can no longer support them, they end up using their wings to push themselves forward. This is also dangerous and unhealthy for geese, since they cannot gain access to water. After several weeks, as a result of force-feeding, the livers swell up to ten times their standard size. This is when they are slaughtered, and such livers marketed as a delicacy in foodie joints. This system of feeding is considered to have originated in medieval Egypt, when it was discovered that before a long migratory trip, wild geese would often stuff themselves. Since the Egyptians thought that the organs of the geese caught after the pre-migration gorging process tasted better than other geese, they artificially carried out the process in locked up geese. This practice was to later on degenerate and devolve into an industry that has taken over restaurants in especially France, which is a producer and consumer of almost 80 percent of the world’s foie gras. The war to take foei gras off the menu may not be rife in every homestead, but it is indeed taking root at a steady rate all over the world. The efforts of the Herne Bay Animal Rights Group were recently rewarded when after two months of demonstrations; they convinced a restaurant in Canterbury not to serve foie gras any more. What I am against is not the gorging process that geese undertake, but the inhumane and cruel feeding systems that the birds go through. The birds should be allowed to gorge themselves naturally. Being one of the greatest controversies in restaurants in the 21st Century, the production of foie gras and its inclusion in menus allover the globe is an issue that, if not addressed in advance, could result to unnecessary conflicts in morally sensitive societies. Let us ban foie gras in our society, until the producers come up with alternative methods of treating ducks and geese.
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running Head: INFLUENCES ON EATING BEHAVIORS Influences on Eating Behaviors Insert name Institution Date Advertisement and Marketing of Coca-Cola Products Introduction
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: THE HUMANITIES TODAY The Humanities Today: Insert name: Institution: Date: The Humanities Today The humanities provide a unique avenue through which we remember our history and foresee our future. The term “humanities” has been given numerous definitions; this paper seeks to provide the acceptable definition. A distinction of the humanities from other modes of human inquiry and expression has also been given. There has been a tremendous development in politics, socioeconomics and technology, a fact that has been proven by the use of specific examples in the following expressions of the humanities: art, music, architecture, philosophy and literature. Defining or describing the humanities in the past has been related to various disciplines included as parts of the humanities. Various authors, such as Dudley and Austin, for instance, have defined the term humanities as all the branches of learning that are not categorized as science, indicating all the forms of learning that involve beauty, that is music literature, sculpture and architecture. This definition, widely accepted in the past, has been recently improved, and the distinction has now encompassed physical, biological and the social sciences. It is critical to note that humanities are today viewed as studies whose centre of attention is on the life of man; hence it would be unwise to distinguish them from biology, for instance, a natural science, if it directs its attention to man, or religion (Drake, 2005). The humanities can be further distinguished from other modes of human inquiry and expression due to their intuitive nature, whereby they cannot be measured, whereas other modes, such as scientific modes, can be measured. The humanities involve the appreciation of man, his relationship to others and the world creatively, intellectually, spiritually and imaginatively. As opposed to other modes of human inquiry, the humanities are not specific in many instances. This is because the humanities deal in the creative and the subjective realm, despite having their researchers who need basic information about their various subjects in a similar fashion to that of other modes. The qualitative phenomenon of the humanities is also a major distinction of the humanities from other disciplines, which are measured and studied quantitatively. Lastly, but certainly not least, is the fact that the basic material of the humanities, the primary source of the material, does not go out of date, the past is prologue. Hence, unlike other modes, the humanities need the latest information about both primary and secondary sources, both the writing as original creative literature and what is being written about the creative literature (Drake, 2005). Art is a basic creative or aesthetic discipline of the humanities. Today, modern art paintings have shown a tremendous development in politics, socioeconomics and technology through their diversity of styles and techniques. Modern artists have used both traditional materials such as oil on canvas as well as modern technology in their paintings. Hard-edge painting, for instance, which involves taking color transitions along straights lines, and the inclusion of curvilinear edges of various color areas, is a common current example that has found its way in many museum galleries. Using modern technology and tools, an artist can achieve particular outlined areas of color with meticulous sharpness and precision (Bono et al, 2008). Among other expressions of the humanities, music is the one has undergone the most significant development. The various musical instruments that have been invented in the recent past attest to technological development. The theremin, for instance, which operated by breaking up a magnetic field around it, and which did not require to be touched to produce a tone, was evolutional. The theremin was an innovation that demonstrated the dramatic way electronic music had shaped the culture of the world when it found use in scoring movies such as The Beach Boys Good Vibrations. The development of architecture has shaped the political field in numerous ways. One of the issues that have come to the rise has been environmental sustainability, with every architecture designer on the rise being required to come up with designs that meet green building principles. The Dynamic Tower is an example of this development, considering that once completed, the tower will be powered from solar panels and wind turbines (The TIMES, 2008). Continental philosophy is a philosophy branch that has changed socioeconomics and politics in a significant way. By uniting theory and practice, continental philosophers have transformed politics. There is no better illustration about this fact than President Obama’s pragmatic application of philosophy to politics. This has been evidenced by his view that the US should act out of strategic self-interest. Electronic literature is a modern form of literature that has changed the world by taking advantage of the invention of modern technology. Despite being criticized by many because of the fact that it could risk losing the opportunity to build traditions, as print literature builds, electronic literature is gaining momentum, with interactive fiction being the preferred means of obtaining information, especially among the younger generation (Bono et al, 2008).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: PAYMENT PROCESSING SERVICES Payment Processing Services Insert name Institution Date Use of Payment Processing Services Due to the growth of information technology, there has been an increase in online transactions which include online shopping and online payments. Business firms have been forced to adopt the emerging trends in order to survive the intense competition which has resulted from online transaction. As a consequence, e-commerce has recorded a significant growth in the modern world (Jeanie, 2009). It has thus become necessary for every business enterprise to hire and utilize payment processing services. Bonnie Carson, the owner and manager of gift and card shop has not been left behind in the adoption of the emerging business strategies. In order to realize the benefits of her newly established online trade, Bonnie needs to provide more payment options for her clients (Schneider, 2008). Some of the payments options Bonnie can provide to her clients include: PayPal This is a payment service which allows users to pay online in a faster and safe manner. This service will allow Bonnie’s customers to pay for their online shopping into her merchant account conveniently without unnecessarily exposing their financial information. Customers will be able to credit their accounts from their bank accounts for easier payments (Schneider, 2008).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Organizational Psychology: Insert name: Institution: Date: Organizational Psychology Organizational psychology is without doubt the field with the most names, being also called industrial and organizational psychology, occupational or personnel psychology, work and organizational psychology, among other names. Christine Doyle defines organizational psychology in her book Work and Organizational Psychology as the field that focuses on individuals and their relationship with their formal organizations in the context of psychological processes. Doyle further writes that organizational psychology can be defined as the study of people in the workplace, at a generous scientific measure. This means that organizational psychology is concerned with studying formal organizations, such as business organizations as well as nonprofit organizations and government agencies, including nonprofit agencies that deal with social service work. Worth noting, however, is that informal organizational processes are not entirely excluded, considering the important implications that they have for the functioning of formal organizations (Doyle, 2003). The Evolution of the Field of Organizational Psychology Basic research in work behavior conducted by various psychologists when the field of psychology was not common is what founded the field of organizational psychology. One of the pioneers of organizational psychology is Hugo Munsterberg, a German experimental psychologist whose interest in the design of work and the selection of workers for jobs was phenomenal in the infancy stages of the field. Walter Dill Scott, who gained the name the ‘father’ of organizational psychology in the 1970s, is remembered for his contribution by his research on the psychology of advertising and the work behavior of salespersons. Other contributors include Fredrick W. Taylor and the couple-team of Frank and Lillian Gilbreth (Farr, 1997). World War 1 presented a great opportunity for organizational psychology, an era that had numerous gains for the field in terms of popularity and interest. At the time, although faced with skepticism, psychologists had various proposals, such as screening recruits for mental deficiency, assigning selected recruits to particular tasks and assisting with psychological and discipline issues. Only the assessment of recruits was allowed, and more than one million recruits had been assessed at the end of the war. After the war, the number of consulting firms rose dramatically in especially the USA. Organization psychologists were included in the selection and placement process of recruits and the end of the war saw the introduction of other specialties in organizational psychology. The period between 1960 and early 1990 was an important period for organizational psychology; research and practice flourished, criticism on psychological tests was on the rise and numerous court actions resulted. The field of organizational psychology has experienced tremendous growth ever since (Farr, 1997). 3. Compare and contrast organizational psychology with at least two related disciplines. Research and work in organizational psychology has made a generous contribution in various disciplines related to organizational psychology. These include organizational behavior, human resource management, ergonomics, and management science. All the aforementioned disciplines are concerned with people at work. Organizational behavior can be defined as “the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the interface between human behavior and the organization, and the organization itself” The first part of this definition clearly shows that organizational psychology and organizational behavior are similar disciplines. What differentiates the two fields if the section of the definition that states that organizational behavior deals with “the organization itself” (Jex, 2002). In particular, individual behavior in organizations, as well as macro-level processes such as organizational structure and strategy are areas that organizational behavior is concerned with. Although organizational behavior is also concerned with the role of macro-level processes and variables, it only covers the impact that the processes and variables have on individual behavior. for that reason, organizational behavior is more diverse in its scope than organizational psychology, in a slight way. This difference comes from the fact that organizational behavior is more diverse in the disciplines it covers, than does organizational psychology. Despite the fact that the greater study in organizational psychology is in subfields in the field of psychology, organizational behavior also draws from other fields such as anthropology and labor relations, among others (Jex, 2002). Human resource management, commonly known as work psychology, is a discipline related to organizational psychology since it is concerned with, among other roles, the recruitment, selection, placement and training processes that employees go through. Personnel psychology is also viewed as a subfield of human resource management, since a large number of personnel psychologists, such as managers and consultants, are in human resource management. Ergonomics, also known as engineering psychology and human factors psychology, is a discipline that deals with designing tools, equipment, and workspaces so as to ensure that such are more compatible with the employees’ abilities. Ergonomics is often considered to be an intermediate field of organizational psychology. Both are however similar in the fact that so as to be able to obtain an resourceful person-machine system, it is critical to consider both the abilities and limitations of employees, and the attributes of the equipment (Nicholas, 2009). 4) Analyze the role of research and statistics in the field of organizational psychology. Research and statistics is important in the field of organizational psychology because of several reasons. One of the roles of research and statistics is in answering questions and in decision making. Organizational psychology makes a widespread use of research and statistics, primarily due to the fact that when used in an organization, they help organizations save a lot of money. This is as a result of factors such as increased productivity, employee satisfaction and fewer accidents in the organization. After years of research and statistics collected in various organizations, researchers have concluded, for instance, that relying on the employment interview is one of the major ways that leads to organizations making losses. This is because the unstructured employment interview is not an effective way of predicting future behavior on the job (Aamodt, 2009). Research and statistics is also critical in an organization because common sense is time and again wrong. In addition, when data is collected analytically and analyzed in a consequential way, selection techniques and evaluating job performance becomes effective. When performing performance appraisals, for instance, research and statistics come in handy, evaluating and comparing the organization’s behaviors over the previous six months or one year. In everyday life, research and statistics is very important in organizational psychology because a good understanding of research and statistics is vital for making intelligent decisions (Aamodt, 2009).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: METABOLIC PATHWAY Metabolic pathway: Insert name: Institution: Date: Metabolic pathway A metabolic pathway is a series of enzymatic reactions that are concerned with regulating the concentration of substances in cells. There are many metabolic pathways, which can exist within a single cell. Metabolic pathways can be broadly classified into two categories: biosynthetic pathways, where small molecules such as simple sugars are accumulated into large molecules such as complex carbohydrates; and degradative pathways, where large molecules such as proteins and carbohydrates are broken down forming products of relatively lower energy. There are various factors that play a critical role in controlling the amounts of final products that are produced by each branch of a metabolic pathway. In reactions that can occur in both directions, chemical equilibrium can be affected by factors such as the temperature or the partial pressure of gaseous reactants. When these changes occur, this tips the balance, and more products can be formed or vice versa, controlling the amounts of final products that are produced by each branch of a metabolic pathway. Exergonic reactions, also known as energy-out reactions also play a vital role. These are reactions that release energy in the course of the reaction, hence resulting in products that have less energy than the reactants. This in effect controls the amount of the final products. Enzymes make their contribution by playing the role of speeding up metabolic reactions through five mechanisms: functional-group transfers, electron transfer, rearrangement, condensation and cleavage. Through functional group transfers, for instance, by one molecule giving up a functional group and another molecule accepting it, enzymes can make their control effective. Products are effective as well, as is illustrated in the various endergonic and exergonic reactions that occur within a cell. Endergonic reactions result in products with more energy than the reactants. Such products can be modified to give yet other products, which can then be used in either metabolic processes or in initiating a further metabolic pathway (BS, 2009).
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: RELIGIOUS DISCRIMINATION Religious Discrimination Insert Name Institution Date: Introduction
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    music
    Running head: MEN VS. WOMEN IN DEALING WITH STRESS Men Vs. Women in Dealing With Stress Insert name Institution Date Men vs. Women in Dealing with Stress Introduction Stress is the body’s response or reaction towards a change that needs a mental, physical or emotional modification. Stress can result from any condition, situation or reasoning that makes one feel frustrated, annoyed, nervous or anxious. Stress is usually caused by a stress-causer or stressor. Handling a serious sickness or taking care of a sick person can be great causes of stress. Stress has various consequences which are manifested in three main forms: behaviors, feelings and physical symptoms (Hislop, 1998). Manifestation of Stress
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Admission
    Music Entrepreneurship
    Music Entrepreneurship QUESTION #1 What is your brand and is it a good one? Who are you? What compelling narrative do you have about yourself? What is your purpose and intention in how you represent yourself? We discussed in class a comment made by an Eastman Professor, regarding how your image lives within the minds of the market, not just your wishful thinking. Knowing the buyer is the final judge, your brand is what people think of when they think of you (and whether they want to hire you or not.) I am a Southern California-based musician, pianist, collaborate artist, a piano teacher and a recording instructor. Since I do collaborations, my brand is not limited to a single type of genre but a mixture of genres, from reggae, pop, classic through religious. I have done several solo recitals and collaborated with ensembles. I have also worked for years at the Heart of Jesus Church as a staff pianist and accompanist. In 2004, I won the grand prize at The Kyunghyang Newspaper competition in South Korea. Further in 2009 and 2010, I was twice honored with Scott Henderson Memorial Scholarship Concert. I am currently working on my Bachelor of Music, Piano Performance and plan to improve my musical prowess and experiences through wide-ranging educational and vocational activities. Just like Charles Ives who was once a church organist, I also would like to compose music that will not only ease the hearts of those heavily laden but will also encourage hope and positive values. I know that music speaks to people’s souls and my passion for playing the piano will motivate me more to reinvent my musicality to keep up with the changing times and tastes of people. My exposure to the reggae music also opens up my compassion to the underclass and aspires to be a medium in expressing their feelings and thoughts through music. I know that this genre is sometimes viewed as rebel music because of its lyrical messages but I believe people will still keep on patronizing this genre because of its playful and danceable musicality. Further, I know that collaboration is a viable means of getting exposure and provides an opportunity to work with well-known professionals. The salability of a brand depends on how it registers in the minds of the buyers, and in my case, since I am more of an accompanist, I will try to increase collaborations with famous celebrities so I will also be given the corresponding exposure and recognition. QUESTION #2 In what ways have you expanded your network and collaborations with NON-musicians, to include connecting with potential donors by enabling them to feel a sense of purpose in their own lives by being a part of something in yours? I try to expand my network and collaboration with non-musicians by keeping abreast of what is going on around me, what events are happening and the latest endeavors that people are getting into. By being aware of the latest events and occurrences give me a hint on what is ‘cooking’ and who the people behind the project or projects that I could get in touch with and include in my network of professional acquaintances. Through my exposures to the different collaborations I made that I learned to value the importance of about ‘who you know’ in the project that in one way or another can help me in being included in the auditions and get hired. Through experience, I have learned that the more I collaborate with new artists, the more chances I get of increasing my network of directors, producers and sponsors which eventually turn into the increase of my potential opportunities. I also make it a point to always give the best performance as possible because I know that I am always judged based on my last performance and through that, the people behind the camera and the sponsors will remember my craft when opportunities arise. Further, in terms of connecting to potential donors and enabling them to feel the cause that I am advocating, I try to be visible in pushing my advocacies, such as in going green, by joining groups of the same causes and promoting this to organizations whose operations are in one way or another, contributories to the success or failure of the advocacy. For instance, we try to promote going green to manufacturing companies and encourage them to join our cause and sponsor our advocacy. They will most likely benefit from it because people continue to patronize products that are associated with green environment and healthy living. QUESTION #3 What are a few ideas for your community service learning project that would show you to be relevant to society through your artistic endeavors? How can you be an effective and active advocate for the arts? Can you combat uninformed opinions? How are you planning to take your personal vision into a larger context? How are you planning to transform an idea into an action that creates value? How are you going to connect people to your service or product in a non-monetary way so the money will be sure to follow? Like Henry Cowell, I would like to teach students in groups and expand the performance practice and techniques for piano. I am aware that this is quite costly as it will need more pieces of piano to train students but introducing it in clusters will provide more students to learn and learn from each other, giving me more time to do other tasks while they are trying to learn from their group mates. This strategy will not only enhance learning but also cooperation and collaboration. Those who are fast learners can teach those who are having a hard time, his learned technique. Further, I can be an effective and active advocate for the arts by promoting learning and playing the piano to the youth instead of being idle or spending their vacant hours to unimportant things. Though it is expected that not everyone will agree to piano lessons but by just teaching them how to read notes can also be an opportunity to explore music and find the musical instrument that they can play well or open their doors to the world of musical composition or collaboration. Olivier Messiaen, for one, developed a new system of teaching harmony through chords and colors. Though people have varied opinions regarding art, I will combat uninformed opinions by teaching them the facts. And I can acquire credibility through my degree, musical learning knowledge and musical performance experiences. I will inculcate to their young minds that excellence is achieved through continuous learning and practice. I will tell the stories of the masters who went through odds just to get what they aspire for. Just as what Harold S. Geneen once said, “In the business world, everyone is paid in two coins; cash and experience. Take the experience first, the cash will come later.” And to make sure that the cash follows, they should also learn to make the necessary connections in order to gain the much-needed exposure. Skills, talents and abilities will be futile if they will remain unperformed. QUESTION #4 Please discuss a minimum of five characteristic or personal strengths that you plan to base your next five years of career pursuits upon? The five characteristic or personal strengths that I plan to base my next five years of career pursuits are innovation, perseverance, collaboration, hunger for excellence and passion. Innovation is a great strength to success because being innovative and different among the rest will determine my craft and the factor that will make people clamor for more of my performances. I need to have my own unique quality of playing the piano to distinguish me from my colleagues. And I know innovation is not easy to create so I also need perseverance to keep me determined in honing my craft. I need to practice over and over again so I can master my abilities and direct them to making a difference.
    $ 0.13
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    Music in Africa
    Music in Africa Name Institution Music in Africa Many people view African music to be vast and vary just as the continent’s many ethnic groups, regions, and nations. Africa covers close to 20 percent of total land in the world land and has a population of more than 900milllion. People of this continent have diverse music that is shaped by foreign influences and also flowered in various indigenous forms. Although we have different types of music in Africa, there are however some common elements in them. The concept of music particularly so in sub-Saharan Africa differs from other cultures and regions(Azevedo, 1993). For instance, in some parts of the continent, the roles of dance are woven tightly, and music in such areas tend to intersect with all aspects of life. The eternal and divine value of people's lives is underscored by music since it helps to mark the crucial moments of life. Despite its diversity, African music shares certain common traits. Emphasis is mostly placed in rhythms rather than on harmony and melody. Repetition is usually considered an organizing principle that builds improvisation(Azevedo, 1993). In most cases, African kinds of music are performed in groups that would in most cases employ a conversational, polyphony, and polyrhythm, style of interlocking. The use of repeated short phrases or ostinato with the accompaniment of melodic-rhythmic patterns is one of the frequently used forms in African music. In addition to that, there is also the use of rhythm, and they are considered as the most differentiating characteristic of African music. In most cases, four basic elements would characterize the African rhythmic structure(Azevedo, 1993). The other common aspect of African music is seen in its texture. From the communal nature of most societies in Africa, their music is marked by a simultaneous sounding of pitches. Ornamental devices, for instance, are mostly used in the creation of additional layers and hence the texture is provided a richer density.
    $ 0.02
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE

Other Essays

  • Sharingpaper premium
    Technology
    Student’s Name Professor’s Name Course Date Sheldon Wolin, “Fugitive Democracy” and “Norm & Form” Introduction Sheldon Wolin on “Fugitive Democracy” and “Norm & Form” is concerned with the political uses and significance of democracy in regard to two entirely opposed ideas that illustrate two equally contrasting states of affairs (Wolin, 29). First, Woldin states that democracy represents of government and political authority normally referred to as a constitution. Second, he speaks of the revolution, unsettling political movement. According to Woldin, the constitution symbolizes the repression of the revolution, while the revolution the demolition of the constitution. The two opposing notions are interlinked by democracy. There is a great need to reconceived democracy not as a type of government, it should be defined as a form of being that is as a result of bitter incidents, and is destined to temporarily succeed (Wolin, 43). Democracy is a rebellious and political moment that assumes destructive and revolutionary proportions. Democracy in Ancient Times Traditionally, democracy has been defined as a type of government in which citizens are vested with supreme power. A democratic state is characterized with proper equality of privileges and rights, social or political equality, and a democratic spirit. The main role of democracy was to transform politics in speech and sight, make power visible, and make decision making open so that ordinary men could have power. Over a period of time, democratic theorists such as Woldin, have primarily concerned themselves with examining the meaning and definition of the notion of democracy, while simultaneously focusing on its obligations, moral foundations, challenges, and general allure of a democratic governance. Democracy in the modern world cannot be perceived as a whole political system, provided with the great potentialities of modern power forms, and its impact on the natural and social world (Wolin, 42). Modern Democracy There is a great difference between facets of democracy in the organizational impulses of modern and ancient constitutionalism. Democracy from primeval to modern times has allegedly weakened the power of law, and the practice of compliance to government. Initially, demos were used to change the political art practice where the elite competed for office and honors. Currently, demos are used to reverse the worldwide trends of institutionalized power systems to benefit a few and exploit many citizens (Wolin, 48). The rupture between modern and ancient democracy conceptions should be considered as the needed foundation for the development of modern democracy. This is because the social complexity, large populations, and great physical dimensions make the politics of a small polis old-fashioned. Conclusion There is a need to renew democracy through relying on voluntary associations. “Voluntary associations are often see as a key to enhancing political participation in the wider community” (Eikenberry, 7). Ordinary citizens have the capability of developing new cultural patterns of unity at any moment. People who use their power for improved healthcare, better schools, safer water, low income housing among others are (without their knowledge) renewing the democracy. “Philanthropic supporters enable the provision of a broad array of activities and activities that may not be provided otherwise” (Eikenberry, 16). Self- governing and independent voluntary associations should always replace hierarchical corporate authorities. This provides the affected interests with voices, hence promoting government through consent in the entire society, and not just in the state. Through such actions, the state complexity will be reduced and the ancient democratic representative mechanisms shall be able to function effectively.
    $ 0.09
    3,513words / 4page
    READ MORE
  • Sharingpaper premium
    Health Services Q & A Part 2
    Health Services (2) What is the correct procedure to follow if a safety breach – an injury, or personal contact with clinical waste, for example – has occurred? In cases where a safety breach such as an injury or personal contact with clinical waste has occurred, the OSH Act states that the employer must report the injury or injuries and provide first aid procedures and facilities. All serious injuries contracted during work (loss of sight, fractures), specific infectious diseases like viral hepatitis and HIV and other injuries that may prevent the worker from working for 10 consecutive days must be reported to WorkSafe (Govt. of Western Australia, 2011). Why is it important to separate waste at the point of generation? It is important to separate waste at the point of generation to reduce the risk of contaminating the personnel involved in the disposal and the public; and its potential to pollute the environment if not managed properly. The process of separation must be done at the point of generation and the separation as per type of waste must be kept during accumulation, handling, interim storage and transportation (National Health and Medical Research Council, 2005). Australia is a product of a unique blend of established traditions and new influences. Give examples of how the Australian society has changed over time. Consider the types of food, traditions, cultural diversity, and technology. The Australian society has changed over time because of the immigration and race relations. Its culture becomes multicultural and diversity was promoted, resulting to a multicultural policy recognising diversity in lifestyle (food, dress) and linguistic. The diverse migrant communities in Australia brought with them their lifestyle, food and cultural practices. An example is the invasion of the British colonists where indigenous people were dominated by force. This invasion also produced mixed European-Aboriginal descent children, where some were forcefully taken from their aboriginal mothers to be ‘civilised’ and reared in the ‘white’ society (everyculture.com, 2014). Australia is a society embracing many different cultures. These cultural differences are demonstrated and expressed in various ways. An example is the Jawoyn indigenous communities in Katherine, Northern Territory; their culture is quite different to the city culture of a capital city. Identify two (2) other cultures within Australia that are quite different from one another, and explain their differences. One is the Islamic culture in Australia. Some of the differences between Muslims and other cultures in Australia are their way of dressing, their practice of segregating men from women, the kind of foods they eat (no pork and its byproducts) and their customs and traditions in terms of marriage and burial. Muslim women generally wear hijab and cover their legs and arms. The Tiwi people or the indigenous group in Australia that live in the Tiwi islands are distinct from other cultures when it comes to their beliefs in mourning, marriage and language. The Tiwi people when mourning paint their body and require others to feed them. Body painting has been practised in the Tiwi culture as part of ceremonies since time immemorial. When it comes to marriage, their culture dictates that newborn girls are engaged to men who are at least 60 years old, but their marriage will not be consummated until the girls reach 14 years of age. Tiwi females are allowed to marry at all times because they believe that a child should not be born fatherless. When the husband dies, the girl’s new partner takes the role of father to all the children of the girl from previous marriages (Hewett et al., 1988). A person may come from a cultural background but not hold all of the same beliefs or customs as others from that background. An example is that a family may raise their children in the Jewish faith but the children may not hold this same belief themselves and may, as adults, live a life that does not uphold any of the traditional Jewish values. For example, the children might not: marry someone from the Jewish faith; celebrate Jewish festivals; speak Hebrew; follow dietary restrictions such as refraining from eating pork or shellfish.
    $ 0.27
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Genetically modified organisms (GMO)
    GMO How are genetically modified organisms different from non-genetically modified organism? Genetically modified organisms are animals, plants and other organisms whose genetic composition was altered using genetic recombination and modification techniques performed in a laboratory. On the other hand, non-GMO organisms are those organisms that are produced naturally and were not modified (the organic & non organic report 2017; rumiano cheese 2011 & non-gmoproject 2016). The recent acts of activist intent on destruction of research plots included plants altered by molecular as well as classical genetic techniques. Is it possible to distinguish between plants altered by classical genetics and those altered by modern techniques? If it’s possible, how is it done?  It is possible and it can be distinguished by checking the DNA of the organism. Thion et al. 2002 conducted an experiment on how to extract/purify DNA of soybeans to check if the sample was transgenic and had undergone extraction and purification. The checking can be done through the use of a microscopic technology. Meanwhile, Schreiber (2013) adds that the detection could be done through a biochemical means where the present GMO will be measured. In isolating and amplifying a piece of DNA, the technique using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used to make millions of copies of the strands of the DNA. It is easier to see visually the altered and non-altered DNA if there are millions of copies of the DNA. What safeguards are in place to protect Americans from unsafe food? Are these methods science-based? Mention at least 2 methods. The US government safeguards the Americans from unsafe foods through the FDA or US Food and Drug Administration. Their methods are science-based, i.e. its whole genome sequencing technology and its measures in controlling microbial hazards. The whole genome sequencing technology is used by the FDA in identifying pathogens isolated from food. The FDA also safeguards foods by controlling microbial hazards through the process of elimination of growth and reduction of growth. The elimination methods are either through heating or freezing while the reduction of growth method involves the use of acidity, temperature and water activity. (Bradsher et al. 2015, pp. 85 – 86; FDA 2007; FDA 2013). Name at least 10 examples of harm to citizens from unsafe food. What percentage of these illnesses was caused by genetically modified organisms? If so, mention any example Some examples of harm to people from unsafe foods are harmful diseases extending from diarrhea to cancer caused by eating foods contaminated with viruses, bacteria, chemical substances and parasites. Around 600 million people around the world fell ill after consumption of contaminated food; diarrheal diseases cause around 125,000 death of children 0-5 years of age (WHO 2015). Based on the studies made by IRT (2011), foods from genetically modified organisms cause damage to the immune system, gastrointestinal and other organs, infertility and accelerated aging. These happen because residue or bits of materials of the GMO food can be left inside the person’s body, which eventually can cause long-term problems. Statistics show that in 9 years after the introduction of GMOs in the market, Americans who had chronic illnesses rose from 7 to 13% and other diseases such as digestive problems, autism, and reproductive disorders are rising (IRT 2011).
    $ 0.13
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    ‘Globalisation is good’ or ‘is it not?’
    ‘Globalisation is good’ or ‘is it not?’ Globalisation is good because it opens doors of opportunities to many. It was the reason for the broad and speedy worldwide interconnectedness of the current social life – from cultural to criminal and from financial to spiritual. This is synonymous to having a borderless world but critics argue stating that globalisation has in fact disconnected the world from its national geographical divisions – the countries (Yoong & Huff 2007). Although some are discounting the benefits of globalisation to the world, I still consider globalisation to be the driving force in the global partnerships between companies that created more opportunities and jobs. The world trade may have plunged, the dollar dwindled, commodities slumped, but overall, globalisation has brought good to the peoples of the world. Globalisation through the internet has unlocked the doors to the sharing of cultures, knowledge, goods and services between peoples of all countries and the modern technologies lifted the barriers for accommodating a speedy transfer. The case of Inditex in marketing their Zara brand globally manifests that in business, one formula does not fit all. Every country has its own culture and styles and a business that is going global must do their homework well before entering the new market. Inditex’s Zara brand was a success to the Europeans but struggles in America and still trying their luck with the Chinese. But despite of these differences, the company is still considering going global because they needed new markets and they knew they will be opening bigger opportunities and jobs to more people (La Coruna 2012). Moreover, globalisation has also done well to the manufacturing sector. Statistics show that the global industrial output in 2010 registered fifty-seven times more than the production in the 1900. Also, globalisation has changed the way things are produced. The manufacturers going global take advantage of the skills and the costs of producing products in different countries. This means that the design of the product may be done in the US, manufactured in China or Taiwan then assembled in the Philippines. So every item – be it an iPad, a doll or a washing machine is collaboratively produced by the best skilled workers in the world at the lowest labor cost (The economist 2012). Consequently, since the product was a collaboration of different countries so it can be also marketed and patronized in those countries (The economist 2012). However, there are some who are openly argues that it failed to deliver the many publicized benefits to the poor. A Filipino economist, Walden Bello, coins a new term to describe the present global economic situation as caused by “deglobalisation” due to the downturn of the economies of big countries such as Singapore, Taiwan, Germany, Japan and Brazil. However, the poor countries are the ones that show faster growth than the rich countries, making globalisation still good because of the opportunities it gives to the needy. On the other hand, Dunning, et al (2007) claims that the current inclinations in the global economy reflect a more distributed rather than a geographical sharing of multi-national enterprise activity and foreign direct investments and to the carrying-out of transactions that are globally oriented. Contrary to the common beliefs, globalisation is not a new thing in the global business world. According to McMahon (2004) it existed since the late parts of the fifteenth century when a society of nations consisting of the countries in Northern Europe entered the rest of the world through exploration, trade and then conquest. This process which involves the exploitation of wealth and power by the European voyagers lead to industrialization in Britain, then mass international industrialization and eventually globalisation (McMahon 2004). Sheel (2005) adds that the interchange of technology and markets between countries have been among the first human innovations since the most primitive times. Globalisation was termed that time as “exchange” where the country’s surpluses were exchanged with other surpluses of peoples from other countries. This old system of exchange was developed, continued to grow and increased to greater heights in the modern times (Waters 2001 as cited in van Krieken, et al 2006). Robertson (2003) asserts that globalisation is inherent in people, motivated by their desire for self-interest and cooperation for survival. The author theorizes that globalisation existed due to the encouragement of interconnectedness by the social, political, economic and technological growths performing as catalysts for both local and global developments (Robertson 2003). Robertson (2003) claims that globalisation has emerged in three waves – during the 1500 to 1800 for the first wave, 18th century up to the 20th century for the second wave and the third wave is after the World War 2. However, Sheel (2008) categorizes globalisation in four phases – the 1st phase took place on the 16th century, the 2nd phase on the late 18th century, the 3rd phase during the 19th to 20th century and the fourth phase is during the end of the 20th century. According to the analysis of Robertson (2003), the first wave (1500 to 1800) saw the upsurge of colonization, invasion, imperialism, misery of the indigenous people, migration and changes in politics, economy and culture. The first wave has encouraged the creation of interconnectedness between peoples, countries and cultures, as instigated by commerce and trade. The second phase (18th to 20th century) was characterized by the start of Industrial Revolution, paving the way for industrialization and increase of income and profits especially to those who had technological skills. The trade routes created during the first wave were utilized by the manufacturers in sourcing their raw materials from other countries. However, by the end of the second wave, civil conflicts in many countries arose, same with the unfortunate events of World Wars 1 and 2 and the Great Depression. The third phase of globalisation transpired after World War 2. This was the phase when European economies were down whilst USA was enjoying a flourishing economy with tough industrial foundation and strong military. The latter part of the third phase (during the middle of the 20th century), the growth of globalisation was challenged by the emergence of communist ideology and the military force of Soviet Union. This challenge resulted to cold war between USA and Soviet Union where Soviet Union collapsed in 1989 (Robertson 2003). In addition to Robertson’s analysis, Sheel (2005) adds that there exists a fourth phase of globalisation that happened during the end of the 20th century where countries the developing and developed countries merged as partners in cross border trade and investments, stimulating the convergence of India and China. However, issues about globalisation’s worthiness have surfaced, some critics consisting of anti-globalisation groups argue that globalisation in corporate organisations have increased povery and inequality (Engler 2007). A study was made by World Value Survey regarding globalisation and 57% of the survey respondents consider globalisation as good. Most of the approving respondents were optimistic that globalisation would encourage the improvement of the workers’ working conditions, economic equality, global peace, global stability and human rights (Leiserowitz, et al 2006). But still, anti-globalisation groups insist that poverty, homelessness and environmental destruction will be highlighted if globalisation continues as it only centers on increasing trade and investment but ignores environmental protections and human rights (Engler 2007). But Edwards & Usher (2008) comment that the argument of the anti-globalisation groups are only superficial because despite their protests against globalisation they still engage in globalisation practices such the use of computers, internets and mobiles in their dissemination of their opposition. This manifests that these protesters are only selective in their opposition. They are not against the good effects of globalisation in communication but only on the aspect of capitalism. The inequality of wealth and poverty is one of the issues that plagued globalisation where critics claim that it makes the poor countries poorer and the rich countries richer as they exploit and amass the wealth of the minority country. But Holmes, et al (2007) reason that there is really a big difference on the distribution of benefits as the developed country provides the money or the capital whilst the developing country (minority) offers its resources and labor. This set-up ends-up with the developed country that provided the financial capitalization getting the bigger share of the profit. However, one aspect of globalisation that really brought good benefits to the people is the technological globalisation. Dahlman (2007) describes technological globalisation as the development of knowledge and skills through research by capable engineers and scientists and offering them to countries that have no inventive capability. The acquisition of these inventions by other countries enables them of acquiring technological transfer. Technologies can be transferred through technical assistance, direct foreign investment, importation of goods and components of products, licensing, copying and reverse engineering (Dahlman 2007). The advancement of communication technology through networking has opened more opportunities and economic growth. In addition, the video of Johan Norberg entitled “Globalisation is good – the case of Taiwan” illustrates the importance of globalisation in uplifting the poor conditions of poor countries. The video presented two former poor countries – Taiwan and Kenya – and compare and contrast what have they become 50 years after. Taiwan became 20 times progressive than Kenya whilst Kenya remained a poor country. Norberg explains that the reason for this difference is the globalisation that Taiwan embraced 50 years ago. Taiwan allowed capitalists to invest in their country whilst they provide the resources and labor. Moreover, Taiwan allowed the integration of their economy to the global trade whilst Kenya continued to shun globalisation. The video also presented the value of the multinational companies like Nike that employs the labor force of Vietnam in their sweatshop. Instead of being exploited, the Vietnamese were given good working conditions, high salaries and more benefits. Contrary of the claim of anti-globalisation groups that multinational investors will only exploit local workers, Vietnamese workers were given the opportunity to rise from their poverty through the works provided for them by globalisation. Conclusion: Contrary to what most people believe, globalisation has been in existence since time immemorial through surplus “exchange” and though the people were not yet privy to the term, they were already using the method of globalisation in their interconnection with other people’s business and lives. Now that the term globalisation is out in the open, people all around the world become mindful of each other’s affairs and consequences, disapproving how the system of globalisation makes the rich countries richer and the poor countries poorer. But as Norberg (2012) has seen it, globalisation is good as it intends to improve productivity and working condition. Though critics argue that it only exploits and amass the wealth of the poor country, Norberg was right when he said that if it is exploitation, then the world’s problem is by not exploiting the poor properly. The case of Taiwan and Kenya is already an eye-opener to those who still shut the door to globalisation. There may be ups and downs in the world of business but it cannot be blamed everything to globalisation because globalisation is only a method of interaction and not the one that is making the business or the deal. Globalisation through the internet has opened the doors to the sharing of cultures, knowledge, goods and services between peoples of all countries and the modern technologies lifted the barriers for accommodating a speedy transfer. The case of Inditex in marketing their Zara brand globally manifests that in business, one formula does not fit all. Every country has its own culture and styles and a business that is going global must be well prepared before entering the new market. Inditex’s Zara brand was a success to the Europeans but struggles in America and still trying their luck with the Chinese. But despite of these differences, the company is still considering going global because they needed new markets and they knew they will be opening bigger opportunities and jobs to more people. This proves that globalization brings good to many but one must know how to diversify and take advantage of the various benefits of globalization to reach greater success in the future.
    $ 0.13
    12,670words / 1page
    READ MORE
  • Admission
    George Washington University: International Business
    George Washington University: International Business Essay Prompt 1: At George Washington University, our students frequently interact with policymakers and world leaders. These experiences and those of our alumni can shape the future of global affairs. If you had the power to change the course of history in your community or the world, what would you do and why? When BBC confirmed the process towards the Korea reunification through their breaking news in 2018, I was among those who overjoyed. And who would not? Anderson Cooper confirmed that South and North Korea were going to sign a reunification agreement that day, an indication that all the years of tension and conflict between the two Koreas would be finally put behind. Finally, the Korean Peninsula would soon be a hub of peace. As a Korean, my desire to the reunification and the promotion of peace throughout the world has led me to dream to become the South Korean Secretary of Foreign Affairs someday so I can smooth out all the problems and hindrances towards the realization of the unification. However, not everyone was in favor of the reunification; and mostly, the younger South Koreans disagree with the idea as they were afraid of the consequences such as the cost that the South Koreans would have to shoulder and the political arrangement that the two leaders would have to arrange. But if I had the power to change the course of history, I would accelerate all the process while all the current political leaders involved in the reunification, namely, President Trump and the two leaders of South and North Koreas are talking and determined to realize the unification. I will use the media and the citizens of the two Koreas in expediting the process and in telling the whole world that they are brothers and should remain as one.
    $ 0.04
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Explicit Teaching
    Explicit Teaching Introduction Not all students are equal. Some are fast learners; others need assistance while others are unruly – not because they are doing it intentionally, but because they are suffering from learning disabilities causing hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. Some adjustments are needed in the learning environment and these adjustments should be tailored based on the individual learning needs of the students. Explicit teaching provides active communication and interaction between the student and the teacher and it involves direct explanation, modeling and guided practice (Rupley & Blair 2009). This paper will demonstrate Explicit Teaching applied to a class scenario with students suffering from a learning disability known as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity. Furthermore, a lesson will be developed featuring an example of an explicit teaching approach showing how to differentiate the lesson to meet the needs of every student, with or without learning disability before finally concluding. 2A: ET Creating a Scenario One of the learning disabilities encountered is AD/HD or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, a neurological disorder that is likely instigated by biological factors that impact chemical messages (neurotransmitters) in some specific parts of the brain. In this type of learning disability, the parts of the brain that control reflective thought and the restriction of ill-considered behavior are affected by the slight imbalances in the neurotransmitters (ADCET 2014). AD/HD is characterized by hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. Students with ADHD are those who never seem to listen, cannot sit still, do not follow instruction no matter how clear the instructions are presented to them, or those who just interrupt others and blurt-out improper comments at improper times. Moreover, these students are oftentimes branded as undisciplined, troublemakers or lazy (NHS 2008). In managing students with AD/HD, some adjustments in the learning environment are needed and these adjustments should be tailored based on the individual needs of the student. It should be noted that persons with AD/HD have different manifestations and the nature of disability as well as its effect on the student’s learning also vary (ADCET 2014). Direct instruction is considered as one of the best approaches in teaching students with AD/HD, but it must be used skilfully and the teacher should think of strategies to prevent it from becoming boring. Killen (2003) states that in using direct instruction, the teacher should emphasise teaching in small steps so the student will be able to practice every step and their practice will be guided to come-up with high level of success. In teaching a student with AD/HD, creative presentation of course material is advisable and this could be done through the use of visual aids and hands-on experience to stimulate the student’s senses. The teacher may use personal stories such as the student’s ideas and experiences (Killen (2003). It will also help if the teacher encourages the student with AD/HD to sit in front or near in front of the classroom to limit distractions (Tait 2010). Telling the student of what the teacher wants him to learn or be able to do – such as reading, writing, etc. - will help in the student’s better understanding of the lesson. In presenting the lesson, the teacher should present the lesson at a pace that the student can handle, such as not too slow or too fast. Important points should be emphasised so the student will realise its significance. To check if the student understands the lesson, the teacher may ask questions and if the student cannot answer, the teacher should re-explain everything that the student gets confused with. New words or new terms should be explained through examples. Assigning colors to different objects is a good visual aid in processing visual information. To help the student with AD/HD process written material, the teacher may use various verbal descriptions as possible. A list of acronyms and terms will also help, as well as a variety of teaching formats like films, flow charts or handouts. At the end of the lesson, a summary should be given, stressing the important points of the lesson. 2B: ET Lesson PlanKey Learning Area: Math Stage: 7 Year level: Year 7 Unit/Topic: Algebra Learner Outcomes: This lesson focuses in essential algebraic topics intended to prepare students for the study of Algebra and its applications. Students are introduced to topics involving mathematical operations with whole numbers, decimals and integers. Upon completion of this lesson, students are expected to answer and use mathematical language to show understanding; use reasoning to identify mathematical relationships; and continue and be familiar with repeating patterns. Indicators: At the end of the lesson, students are able to recognise what comes next in repeating patterns, identify patterns used in familiar activities, recognise an error in a pattern, able to simplify algebraic fractions, factorise quadratic expressions and operate with algebraic expressions. Resources: Whiteboard, colored visual aids, workbooks and class notes where the procedures are listed. Prior Knowledge: Students possess basic math knowledge (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). They also have basic understanding of the terms such as whole numbers, positive, negative, decimals and integers. Assessment Strategies: To assess the students’ learning, students will be asked to do mathematical operations. Their answers will be checked, marked and recorded; and those who are unable to answer correctly will be asked what is it that they are getting confused. For students with learning disability, their computations will be checked and evaluated. Comments will be recorded in a record book regarding the student’s performance.
    $ 0.13
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE
  • Tertiary education
    Ethical Promotion Paper (Nursing)
    Ethical Promotion Paper In today’s globalization, the use of electronic health record significantly helps in sharing patient’s information to other healthcare providers across health organizations for patient’s better access to health care, decrease of costs and improvement of the quality of care (Ozair et al. 2015). However, the increasing use of electronic health record of patients over paper records sometimes generates ethical issues that should be given attention. Nurses are bound to follow the Code of Ethics and sharing of patient information, even digitally, should be done within the right conduct. This paper will discuss the article written by Ozair, Jamshed, Sharma & Aggrawal (2015) entitled, “Ethical issues in electronic health records: a general overview”, which was published in Perspectives in Clinical Research. My thoughts on the role that health care professionals should play in resolving the said ethical issue will also be discussed, as well as the specific theory that will support my position. Article’s Summary Ozair et al. (2015) aimed to explore the ethical issues created in the use of electronic health record (EHR), as well as to discuss its possible solutions. Although the use of digital health record could improve the patient’s quality of healthcare and decrease cost, transferring or sharing information through digital technology poses hazards that could lead to security breaches and endanger safety of information. When the patient’s information or health data are shared to others without the patient’s consent, then their autonomy is put at risk. Electronic health record contains the patient’s health data including his/her medical diagnoses, history, immunization dates, treatment plans and laboratory results. Every person has the right to privacy and confidentiality and his information can only be shared if he permits it or dictated by law. If the information was shared because of clinical interaction, then that information should be treated as confidential and be protected. The confidentiality of information can be protected by allowing only the authorized personnel to have access. Thus, the users are identified and assigned with passwords and usernames. However, these may not be enough to protect the confidentiality of the patient’s information and stronger policies on security and privacy are needed to secure the information. According to a survey, around 73% of doctors communicate with other doctors through text about work and when mobile devices get lost or stolen, the confidentiality of the information about patients are put at stake. Hence, security measures such as intrusion detection software, antivirus software and firewalls should be used to protect the integrity of data and maintain patient’s confidentiality and privacy. When patient data is transferred, there is a possibility of the data getting lost or destructed especially when errors are made during the “cut and paste” process. The integrity of data may also be compromised when the physician uses drop down menu and his/her choices become limited due to the choices available in the menu, causing him/her to select the wrong choice, thus, leading to huge errors. However, the authors claim that these ethical issues can be resolved through the creation of an effective EHR system, involving clinicians, educators, information technologies and consultants in the development and implementation of the ERH system. My Thoughts on the role of health care professionals The role of health care professionals is vital in ensuring that the right of patients to privacy and confidentiality are observed even in the use of electronic health record (EHR). Patient’s human rights in care include their rights to confidentiality and privacy (Cohen & Ezer 2013). To ensure that there will be no ethical issues created in the use of EHR, health care professionals should be properly informed about the importance of the system, as well as the ethical issues that could arise if the rights of the patient are not properly observed. Hence, it is vital that the knowledge of the health care professionals regarding the right implementation of EHR starts from their education curriculum, as well as in their continuous training and nurses’ participation in the workflow of EHR (Koolaee, Safdan & Bouraghi 2015). Computer literacy is a must for health care professionals to ensure that the sharing of health data information are not lost or destructed during the process and medical errors are not committed. Conclusion The use of electronic health record improves and increases efficiency in patient care, as well as patients’ access to care across health organizations. However, health care professionals should never ignore the rights of patients to their privacy and confidentiality so they should be properly informed if ever there is a need for their health data information to be shared to others to avoid ethical issues. List of References Cohen J. & Ezer T. (2013). ‘Human rights in patient care: a theoretical and practical
    $ 0.09
    0words / 0page
    READ MORE